LB - Manpower

Home | Real Estate Search | Classifieds | Place an Ad | Public Notices | Galleries | Obituaries | Subscriber Services | Kingman Digital | Contact Us
Kingman Daily Miner | Kingman, Arizona

home : latest news : latest news May 26, 2016


1/27/2013 6:01:00 AM
Step one in Kingman school security: Lock classroom doors
The move is free and can be implemented immediately
AHRON SHERMAN/Miner
The KUSD school board listens to a presentation from Superintendent Roger Jacks, who sits on the left with his back o the camera, next to KPD Chief Robert DeVries and Mohave County Sheriff’s Office Captain Greg Smith.
AHRON SHERMAN/Miner
The KUSD school board listens to a presentation from Superintendent Roger Jacks, who sits on the left with his back o the camera, next to KPD Chief Robert DeVries and Mohave County Sheriff’s Office Captain Greg Smith.
JC AMBERLYN/Miner
Kingman Middle School teacher Ron Bahre demonstrates how he locks his door when class is in session and how he would lock it in a lockdown.
JC AMBERLYN/Miner
Kingman Middle School teacher Ron Bahre demonstrates how he locks his door when class is in session and how he would lock it in a lockdown.

Ahron Sherman
Miner Staff Reporter


If the Kingman Unified School District had its way, it would put a school resource officer in each of its campuses. But even if funds were available to do something like that, it would take one or two years to fully accomplish.

Given that, the district on Wednesday revealed its plan to beef up school security in the immediate future without breaking the bank. One of the aspects of the plan hinges on getting teachers to lock classroom doors when class is in session.

"This is something that can be done immediately" and without cost, said Kingman Middle School teacher Ron Bahre, who put forth the idea to the district and board. "Plus, (we'd know) our kids are secure."

The doors at KMS open outward and can be locked with a key from the outside. When used like this, the inside remains unlocked. During a lockdown situation, the doors can be locked from the inside, leaving both sides of the doors locked.

Doors throughout the district essentially work the same way, but some of them have different hardware, said KUSD Maintenance and Facilities Director Craig Schritter.

Bahre suggested creating and enforcing a policy that would have teachers locking their doors from the outside and holding them open during passing periods while students file into their classrooms. Once the bell rings, teachers would be trained to shut the door, which is already locked, and start their lessons.

Students late to class would need to go to administration and have someone let them into class, Bahre said. This will also cut down on students being late because they wouldn't be able to slip in and administration would be aware that they were late, which has consequences.

District staff as well as the school board supported Bahre's idea, but KUSD Superintendent Roger Jacks said he wants to hear more from teachers.

"There's more traffic that goes through a classroom door (during class) than many would expect," Jacks said.

Students leave class to use the bathroom, go to the nurse and visit the office, Jacks said. The district needs to find out from its teachers how disruptive stopping a lesson to get up and to unlock the doors for a student would be, Jacks said.

Training for this procedure, should the district decide to move forward with it, would be comprised of showing teachers exactly how to lock and unlock the doors on a daily basis and during an emergency situation, Jacks said.

Bahre, who already does what he wants the rest of the district's teachers to do, said it's not disruptive at all. He only allows one student out of class at a time, and when the student comes back to class all he or she has to do is knock on the door and answer when Bahre asks, "Who is it?"



New alarm

Bahre also suggested coming up with an alarm separate from all other bells that ring on a daily basis that tells employees to initiate lockdown procedures.

Other parts of the district's plan include more training for employees, more training for administrators - possibly from the National Association of School Resource Officers, updating emergency procedures with the latest strategies, improving lockdown of facilities, making it so intruders can't see into classrooms, creating a policy that forces employees to wear identification badges, and mandating that schools conduct lockdown drills each quarter.

Additional aspects of the plan include looking into the feasibility of putting a security guard at every school, working with local law enforcement to see if agencies can park surplus police cars at schools, conducting table-top exercises with employees and law enforcement, installing security cameras at all district schools, providing law enforcement with access to school lockboxes, and exploring the idea of getting retired police officers to provide additional security.

Board member Debbie Francis said she has heard from several retired police officers that they would be willing to help with school security for free.



Panic buttons

District Finance Director Wanda Hubbard looked into the cost of getting panic buttons - similar to the ones used at banks - installed at all schools. She found out that it's quite cheap.

It turns out that for $50 a school, the district can get two panic buttons installed that would be connected to local law enforcement.

The idea of arming and training one employee at each school did not get much support from the board, the district and local law enforcement.

"Our thought is that's not a good idea," said KPD Chief Robert DeVries, who attended the meeting.

Things changed after the Columbine, he said. Officers now are trained to enter a school - even if they're by themselves - and neutralize the threat in an active shooter situation, he said.

"You literally place their life in jeopardy" by arming employees, he said. When an officer enters a school looking to neutralize a threat and he or she sees an armed employee, how is the officer supposed to know that the employee isn't actually the threat?


    Most Viewed     Recently Commented
•   Drug overdose investigation leads to murder charge (4173 views)

•   Arizona rules to change for brake light infractions (2773 views)

•   Kingman's Army Air Field Museum closing (2616 views)

•   More burglary charges added to list against Kingman man (2097 views)

•   Indictments: One man ends up with five DUI counts (2078 views)



Reader Comments

Posted: Tuesday, January 29, 2013
Article comment by: Sie Williams

Seriously the biggest threat to childrens safety is the 'gun free zone'. This has killed more children than legally authorized in school carriers than anythign else. A school district in Tx has teachers authorized to carry and had not one problem...for FIVE YEARS! It works no matter how uncomfortable you feel about it or how you twist it to be a bad thing, it's not. Gun free zones do one thing, get people murdered by making them defenseless victims. Israel has armed teachers with both handguns AND semi auto rifles...works there. So many examples and so little excuses to NOT allow it. A Principle stopped a gunman in one school by fetching his handgun from his truck outside. Start thinking logically.

Posted: Tuesday, January 29, 2013
Article comment by: Sure and Maybe Not

@ Yes and No - I mostly agree with your comment. I don't like the idea that children or adults could be trapped in a locked classroom during an emergency like a fire. As for the panic button, I feel that is a nice, but mostly ineffective, redundant safety measure because, again, by the time it takes for the police to arrive, the damage is already done. The panic button brings is a false sense of security.

Posted: Monday, January 28, 2013
Article comment by: tj denton

ill tell you how we need to start building our schools and it would solve this whole problem. build it like a jail. have someone in a locked control room that operates ill doors, along with the use of intercoms and cameras. in that control room is a trained individual with a firearm who can identify any threats and their locations, around the entire school.

Posted: Monday, January 28, 2013
Article comment by: Step Up

If you all would have come to the meeting you would have been told about how the doors lock. You can open the door from the inside at any time, but no one can get in from the outside.
@ What?
Do you want to be the armed teacher that the first responder sees with a gun and shoots because he doesn't know you're the good guy?


Posted: Monday, January 28, 2013
Article comment by: no name

Concerned citizen
This does nt create a fire hazard. The doors open to the hallway and therefore if they are locked on the outside on a daily basis they will still open in that case.


Posted: Monday, January 28, 2013
Article comment by: Amy Book

Regarding the door locks, what about the kind you see in a hotel room, where the door is always locked from the outside, but people inside are able to open and leave?

Posted: Monday, January 28, 2013
Article comment by: Yes and No

ok, I like that they are trying to come up with ideas. I like the panic button and alarm, but not so sure on the locked doors. What if the teacher has the door locked and an emergency happens where the power goes off and a fire or something like that where they need to clear the building. Now you are dealing with the teacher having to find their way to the door in the dark, finding the correct key and unlocking it. I like the idea that they could lock it if there is a "lockdown" situation, but not everyday.

Posted: Monday, January 28, 2013
Article comment by: Step Up

I know there were A LOT of parents that pulled their kids from school the week before Christmas break. I know there were a ton of comments on how the schools don't know what they are doing.
I want to know where these people were Wednesday night for this meeting. I counted 16 people in the audience and I was the only parent there. (that was not also a teacher/administrator)
If you all are so worried about your kids, get yourself to these meetings.
I was disappointing that something was not set in place. There were a lot of ideas, but nothing agreed upon. (except the panic buttons)
Come on parents, stop complaining if you're not willing to support the district by coming to the meetings, find out what is going on and speak up.


Posted: Monday, January 28, 2013
Article comment by: There's got a be another way .

I don't think locking every classroom door is the solution. There's got to be a way where only guests have access to the office area (to sign in). At one elementary school the bathrooms are right near the front main doors. Who designed this?


@Just J
I understand. Get a Dr. note.


Posted: Sunday, January 27, 2013
Article comment by: concerned citizen

OK I get the idea but my question would be..... what kind of fire hazard does this create?

Posted: Sunday, January 27, 2013
Article comment by: love the locals

I like the ideas that Mr Bahre put forth, but it looks like the District office will screw it up. "Training procedures" on how to lock and unlock doors??? Really?? Also the idea of a separate unique alarm to initiate lockdown procedures is great. Please Roger Jacks don't over think it and mess it up

Posted: Sunday, January 27, 2013
Article comment by: gun owner 000

Here's a thought Why not take all of the security doors, metal detectors, and body scaanners "King Ronnie" had installed at the County Office Building, and distribute them around the County schools. There ought to be plenty to go around, and we won't need them once Mr. Walker gets his "walking papers".

Posted: Sunday, January 27, 2013
Article comment by: What ?

In response to having a trained and armed employee at every school, Police Chief DeVries says...

"Our thought is that's not a good idea,"

"Things changed after the Columbine. Officers now are trained to enter a school - even if they're by themselves - and neutralize the threat in an active shooter situation", he said.

Yea, that worked really well in Sandy Hook didn't it DeVries?


Posted: Sunday, January 27, 2013
Article comment by: For a Better Kingman

I am glad to see there is actually some sense being talked at KUSD. Realizing that arming employees is dangerous and taking common sense measures like locking doors is exactly what is needed. Kudos.

Posted: Sunday, January 27, 2013
Article comment by: Just J

I am not sure I like the constant lock down idea with classrooms, why? Because I as a parent already know kids are denied going to restroom when needed, now it will be more so. If they want to do this then I suggest putting a bathroom in every classroom! My son has a bladder issue and actually had accident in classroom because he was not allowed to use restroom during class.



Article Comment Submission Form
Comments are not posted immediately. Submissions must adhere to our Use of Service Terms of Use agreement. Rambling or nonsensical comments may not be posted. Comments are limited to Facebook character limits. In order for us to reasonably manage this feature we may limit excessive comment entries.
Submit an Article Comment
First Name:
Required
Last Name:
Required
Telephone:
Required
Email:
Required
Comment:
Required
Passcode:
Required
Anti-SPAM Passcode Click here to see a new mix of characters.
This is an anti-SPAM device. It is not case sensitive.
   


Advanced Search

HSE - We want to hear from you
Kingman Chamber News
House Ad- Dining Guide
Auto Racing Upickem
Find more about Weather in Kingman, AZ
Click for weather forecast






Find it Features Blogs Milestones Extras Submit Other Publications Local Listings
Real Estate Search | Classifieds | Place an Ad | Find Kingman Jobs | Kingman Chamber | e-News | Contact Us | RSS | Site Map
LB - Auto Racing Upickem

© Copyright 2016 Western News&Info, Inc.® The Kingman Daily Miner is the information source for Kingman and surrounding area communities in Northern Arizona. Original content may not be reprinted or distributed without the written permission of Western News&Info, Inc.® Kingman Daily Miner Online is a service of WNI. By using the Site, kdminer.com ®, you agree to abide and be bound by the Site's terms of use and Privacy Policy, which prohibit commercial use of any information on the Site. Click here to email your questions, comments or suggestions. Kingman Daily Miner Online is a proud publication of Western News&Info, Inc.® All Rights Reserved.


Software © 1998-2016 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved