LB - Mattressland 0425 Temperpedic

Home | Real Estate Search | Classifieds | Place an Ad | Public Notices | Galleries | Obituaries | Subscriber Services | Kingman Digital | Contact Us
Kingman Daily Miner | Kingman, Arizona

home : latest news : latest news April 29, 2016


6/27/2013 6:00:00 AM
Heat wave coming just in time for weekend
People enjoy Centennial Park recently – on a day that wasn’t as hot as what it will be over the weekend. While hot temperatures come to Arizona every summer, officials are urging people to be extra-cautious this weekend, when daytime highs will exceed 110 degrees.JC AMBERLYN/Miner
People enjoy Centennial Park recently – on a day that wasn’t as hot as what it will be over the weekend. While hot temperatures come to Arizona every summer, officials are urging people to be extra-cautious this weekend, when daytime highs will exceed 110 degrees.
JC AMBERLYN/Miner

Suzanne Adams-Ockrassa
Miner Staff Reporter


KINGMAN - Dig out the kiddy pool and crank up the air conditioning - it's going to get hot this weekend.

The National Weather Service has issued an excessive heat warning for portions of Southern Nevada, southeastern California and northwestern Arizona.

The service is predicting that temperatures in Kingman will climb well past the 100-degree mark before the week ends. Today's high is expected to be above 100 degrees, and temperatures will stay in that general vicinity for the next few days.

Forecasts call for high temperatures to start to drop on Saturday and be considerably cooler by Wednesday, according to Nancy Selover, a state climatologist at Arizona State University.

"Our last record high for this time of year was set in the 1990s, but high temperatures aren't that unusual for this time of year," she said. "We usually get some high temperatures around the end of June. Then the first week of July and into August we get the moisture from the monsoons."

That moisture cools the air during the night and helps keep down daytime temperatures, Selover said.

This week's high temperatures are being caused by a high-pressure system that's stalled over the state, preventing a low-pressure system in the south from bringing in more moisture, she said.

"This is a pretty strong circulation system," Selover said. "It's not an El Nino or La Nina. It's just an unusually strong high-pressure system. These types of systems can sit around for weeks. This one won't. It'll move out by mid-week."

In the meantime, the Mohave County Department of Public Health is recommending that people limit their time outdoors and drink plenty of water. Avoid drinks that have a high sugar content or have caffeine in them and avoid alcohol. These drinks can cause you to lose more fluid.

Assistant Health Director Jennifer McNally also recommends that people stay indoors in air conditioning if possible. If you don't have air conditioning, hang out at a place that does for a few hours or take a cool shower or bath.

Electric fans can provide a cool breeze, but they won't prevent a heat-related illness, such as heat stroke or heat exhaustion, she said.

She also recommends people wear lightweight, light-colored and loose-fitting clothing and a wide-brimmed hat outdoors. Use sunscreen. Never leave anyone or a pet in a closed, parked vehicle.

Also, keep an eye out for the signs of heat stroke and heat exhaustion.

Victims of heat stroke can have:

• a high body temperature

• red, hot, dry skin

• a rapid pulse

• headache

• dizziness

• nausea

• confused actions, and may become unconscious.

Victims of heat exhaustion may:

• sweat heavily

• be pale

• have muscle cramps

• act tired

• have weakness in their limbs

• become dizzy

• have a rapid pulse

• have shallow breathing and a headache.

In both cases, seek medical help immediately and try to cool down the victim, McNally said. Get the person into the shade, start bathing them with cool water and monitor their body temperature. Do not give heat stroke victims fluids unless directed to do so by a doctor.



Click for home delivery with comics, grocery deals, inserts, TV listings, coupons and more

ICT - Mohave Electric WI-Power Boy 2nd ad
Related Stories:
• Now That's a Good Idea


    Most Viewed     Recently Commented
•   Hard legal lessons faced by accused in home invasion case (3018 views)

•   20-year sentence possible for murder in Yucca (2026 views)

•   ATV rider the focus of a complicated rescue effort (1579 views)

•   McCain fundraiser arrested following drug raid (1231 views)

•   Alleged theft among counts returned by grand jury (1197 views)



Reader Comments

Posted: Saturday, June 29, 2013
Article comment by: cant believe it

LMAO jist me :))

Posted: Friday, June 28, 2013
Article comment by: V Stokes

@cant believe it

Actually...not quite correct. The moisture does indeed cool the temps as a rule, but it is perceived as being warmer by those of us that live in it. Because of more humidity, you can't cool your body as well by sweating.

Basic HVAC...remove the humidity and the home will feel cooler even though the temp is the same.

I do agree that the worst thing is when it rains early, then the sun comes out, heats stuff up and the humidity goes way up.

Still better than Virginia on a 100 degree day with 85% humidity.


Posted: Friday, June 28, 2013
Article comment by: jist me

i agree with cant, lets just BAN monsoons

Posted: Thursday, June 27, 2013
Article comment by: cant believe it

That moisture cools the air during the night and helps keep down daytime temperatures, Selover said.


Why cant people realize that rain RAISES the humidity levels instead of cooling the air down?

I just cant believe how many people out there doesnt realize this. They complain about how hot and humid it gets after the rains but never realize its the rains that cause all the humidity!

The more moisture in the air the higher the humidity!

This is why monsoons should not be welcome!




Article Comment Submission Form
Comments are not posted immediately. Submissions must adhere to our Use of Service Terms of Use agreement. Rambling or nonsensical comments may not be posted. Comments are limited to Facebook character limits. In order for us to reasonably manage this feature we may limit excessive comment entries.
Submit an Article Comment
First Name:
Required
Last Name:
Required
Telephone:
Required
Email:
Required
Comment:
Required
Passcode:
Required
Anti-SPAM Passcode Click here to see a new mix of characters.
This is an anti-SPAM device. It is not case sensitive.
   


Advanced Search

HSE - We want to hear from you
Kingman Chamber News
House Ad- Dining Guide
Auto Racing Upickem
Find more about Weather in Kingman, AZ
Click for weather forecast






Find it Features Blogs Milestones Extras Submit Other Publications Local Listings
Real Estate Search | Classifieds | Place an Ad | Find Kingman Jobs | Kingman Chamber | e-News | Contact Us | RSS | Site Map
LB - Doctor Drive Now

© Copyright 2016 Western News&Info, Inc.® The Kingman Daily Miner is the information source for Kingman and surrounding area communities in Northern Arizona. Original content may not be reprinted or distributed without the written permission of Western News&Info, Inc.® Kingman Daily Miner Online is a service of WNI. By using the Site, kdminer.com ®, you agree to abide and be bound by the Site's terms of use and Privacy Policy, which prohibit commercial use of any information on the Site. Click here to email your questions, comments or suggestions. Kingman Daily Miner Online is a proud publication of Western News&Info, Inc.® All Rights Reserved.


Software © 1998-2016 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved