Home | Real Estate Search | Classifieds | Place an Ad | Public Notices | Galleries | Obituaries | Subscriber Services | Kingman Digital | Contact Us
Kingman Daily Miner | Kingman, Arizona

home : opinion : columns May 26, 2016


12/16/2012 6:00:00 AM
Guest Column: Safe, courteous driving will get you a ticket
Lyle Winter
Kingman Resident

I would like to thank the officer with the Mohave County Sheriff's Department for encouraging me to drive in an unsafe manner.

I was pulled over on Gordon Avenue for going around the water puddles that encroach the roadway. No, there was no oncoming traffic at the time. Yes, I could travel 35 mph through the puddles and cause wet and useless brakes and lack of vision for myself and, if there is oncoming traffic, throw large amounts of dirty water and loose gravel on my fellow drivers. How are you going to like me now!

I was written up under statute 28-721A. I have attached the statute for everyone to view. Maybe we need to have them add a bullet note to this statute.

With this being said, I would like to apologize to all my fellow driver in advance for spraying your vehicles with dirty water with a few rocks attached.

Again, thank you to the MCSO deputy for telling me you could write me a ticket for trying to be safe and courteous during the bad weather.

28-721. Driving on right side of roadway; exceptions:

A. On all roadways of sufficient width, a person shall drive a vehicle on the right half of the roadway except as follows:

1. When overtaking and passing another vehicle proceeding in the same direction under the rules governing the movement.

2. When the right half of a roadway is closed to traffic while under construction or repair.

3. On a roadway divided into three marked lanes for traffic under the rules applicable on the roadway.

4. On a roadway designated and signposted for one-way traffic.

B. On all roadways, a person driving a vehicle proceeding at less than the normal speed of traffic at the time and place and under the conditions then existing shall drive the vehicle in the right-hand lane then available for traffic or as close as practicable to the right-hand curb or edge of the roadway, except when overtaking and passing another vehicle proceeding in the same direction or when preparing for a left turn at an intersection or into a private road or driveway.


    Most Viewed     Recently Commented
•   Panhandler boosted income with an identity theft operation, Kingman Police say (5117 views)

•   Drug overdose investigation leads to murder charge (4173 views)

•   Arizona rules to change for brake light infractions (2773 views)

•   Kingman's Army Air Field Museum closing (2616 views)

•   Kingman burglary spree investigation sparks arrests (2462 views)



Reader Comments

Posted: Wednesday, December 19, 2012
Article comment by: Frank Lee Speaking

"it was deep enough to choke intake valves on the model car I had rented."

If it was a rental car, that theory would be worth testing. As we used to say when i lived in Alaska:

What's the difference between a rental car and a four wheel drive truck?

You can take the rental car ANYWHERE.

LOL


Posted: Wednesday, December 19, 2012
Article comment by: tj denton

lets just get it straight, most of mohave county is compliled of bad drivers and when it rains or snows, those bad drivers are worse drivers. plain and simple. your best bet is worry about you and your vehicle accept in a defensive matter. worrying about weather people like you or not is just silly

Posted: Wednesday, December 19, 2012
Article comment by: help .....

The mechanic at Planet Nissan specifically told me that if water underneath the car was deep enough to cover your shoes, it was deep enough to choke intake valves on the model car I had rented. So my original comments at this thread still stand - what would a cop do if you remained in your lane through a puddle (or worse yet, flowing water), and your car came to a halt right there in the roadway? If he would ticket you either way - if you swerved into the oncoming lane, or remained in your lane and got stuck - you might just as well leave the car at home and walk., at least until some common sense on the part of law enforcement prevails.

Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2012
Article comment by: There You Have It

@ help....

Your talking about the Mass Airflow Sensor. Yes, getting it wet may shutdown but more than likely cause the car to idle rough, it would also turn on your Check Engine Light. It would take a massive amount of water to get to it though as it is usually "after" your air filter. Same thing for your intake valves, your unlikely to get water to your intake valve for the same reason. You would have to literately be sitting in water more than 3" deep though and even if driving at a high rate of speed.


Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2012
Article comment by: help .....

@Stokes.....who said anything about a car PARKED in 3" of water.? I was DRIVING through flowing water of at least that depth during a thunderstorm. I just spoke by telephone with a lead mechanic at Planet Nissan (tel#702-876-8000) who explained that, in that setting, the car could easily shut down as the "mass inflow sensor" kicks in, also if water goes into the intake valve (even a few inches of water can do this). As for the link, you could go to its primary page and trace down the thread.

Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2012
Article comment by: V Stokes

@Are You?
Because he made a claim that I can't find any proof of...thats why.

As to me being a mechanic..no...but I've done engine and transmission rebuilds, clutch replacements, brake jobs, suspension repairs, body work, etc...so I know something about cars. I don't know of anything that would disable a car parked in 3" of water....especially since most cars have at least 6" of ground clearance.


Posted: Tuesday, December 18, 2012
Article comment by: Are You?

@ V Stokes

Are you a mechanic? If not why does @ help .....have to explain anything to you. Only thing I could say Lyle is your slow driving may have impeded the MCSO's who could of been in a hurry to get to lunch or something.


Posted: Monday, December 17, 2012
Article comment by: V Stokes

@ help .....

Sorry....your link appears to be bad.

All I can find in a few searches is people who drove through 1-3 ft of water, not puddles 3" deep.

Why not answer my question since it was explained to you twice? What sensor?

Btw..tow truck drivers and car rental people aren't mechanics.


Posted: Monday, December 17, 2012
Article comment by: Joe Blow

Well, if you need your ticked "fixed" send me e-mail and I'll give you the person at MCSO who will help ...

Hopefully, if Gordon Avenue is in the city limits of Kingman, our crack Engineering Department will design another plan to see water go uphill just like the rest of their "designs" ...


Posted: Monday, December 17, 2012
Article comment by: help .....

@Stokes....I rented a new Nissan from Hertz at the Bullhead-Laughlin Airport last summer and during a thunderstorm in Searchlight, the car came to an immediate dead halt in a puddle no deeper than three inches. The tow truck driver explained the cause, and so did the Hertz people at the airport rental counter. At www.chevymalibuforum.com/forums/archives/index.php/t-7951.html and numerous other related websites, you can read of others' experiences with this problem.

Posted: Monday, December 17, 2012
Article comment by: Joe Schmo

@HJ

Gordon Drive is slated to be improved next year by the City of Kingman. The power poles are already in the process of being moved. The result will be a widened road and better drainage.


Posted: Monday, December 17, 2012
Article comment by: V Stokes

@this should help .....
Please...enlighten us...what sensor? How does it stop the car? How does it know pooled water from spray while driving in a heavy rain? I've never, ever had a car (esp a newer one) shut down when driving through puddles. I have had a few older ones that would run rough for a while if I drove through deeper stuff at a higher speed, but they didn't have fender liners and sealed ignitions like cars for the last 20 yrs.

I call shenanigans!

Simple way to keep your brakes working is to lightly apply them as you drive slowly through puddles and for a short distance after. Common sense.


Posted: Monday, December 17, 2012
Article comment by: H J

Or the city/ county could fix the problem with proper drainage. But that would mean spending taxpayers
Money for services when both have clearly become
Profit centers not providing us with services in exchange
For our taxes!


Posted: Monday, December 17, 2012
Article comment by: mud puddle

When I read this artical I thought to myself, how many times have I done this in Golden Valley,I really don't want to fill my brakes with mud and water. Now my question is......The drivers book says...if you are following a bicycle stay behind until it is safe to pass if an on coming car is approaching...then pass 3 feet from the bicycle to the left and the book shows you can go over the center line. That rule I think is down right dangerous. I do have respect for the Kingman officers and sheriff department but wonder about that bicycle law.

Posted: Monday, December 17, 2012
Article comment by: Frank Lee Speaking

@Lyle Winter

All you had to do was slow waaaaaay down and drive through the water slowly. And before you bring it up, anyone behind you who hits you would be guilty of following too closely and could be cited for doing so.

"throw large amounts of dirty water and loose gravel on my fellow drivers. How are you going to like me now!"

Your threat to drive fast and do that could result in your getting a ticket for driving in an unsafe manner for conditions. You got the ticket you deserve. Fight it in court. It may take that lesson to get the point through to you.


Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2012
Article comment by: Thanks for this

I will gladly take your water and rocks if you refrain from writing another editorial piece about how you were pulled over. Secondly, in my experience brakes work quite well when wet, and thirdly I have never seen water defy gravity and wrap around my car to hit the windshield when I hit a puddle, but maybe Gordon Ave is special. Thanks for your post.

Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2012
Article comment by: Sturm Gewehr

I think there is a provision in the Motor Vehicle Code about avoiding of hazards in the roadway. A large puddle (or small lake) certainly is a hazard in itself but could hide an even greater hazard in its murky depths.


Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2012
Article comment by: The Voice of Kingman.

Well, Lyle, driving around puddles on the wrong side of the roadway might confuse other drivers. I know I would wonder what in the world you were doing if I observed you driving like this. And in trying to avoid your erractic driving, I would look like I was driving erractic. Consequently, there would be a lot of erractic drivers in the area. Not a very good formula to keep from confusing each other.

So, next time, just slow a bit when you enter these puddles.


Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2012
Article comment by: Desert Angel

I'm sorry you received a ticket for safe driving under unsafe conditions. I guess the police had nothing better to do at the time. I received a ticket for a crack at the top of my windshield, I didn't even notice it. But I was driving through the Butler area and must have looked suspicious. Police are supposed to be here to protect and to serve. But mostly they just serve us tickets. Must be low on funds for their annual Christmas party.

Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2012
Article comment by: MCSO SERGEANT

Your story seems to slant the reader into belieiving that you were issued a citation for your safe driving habits. Was it a citation with a court date attached or a warning?

I do appologize for the negative encounter, sometimes police officers don't always have the developed curb side manner we wished they did. Perhaps the officer could have better explained the situation.

I really don't think the intent was to force you to drive in an unsafe manner. The safest practice is to stay in your own lane of travel. There may be some instances when a short deviation from that practice may be reasnable under very limited circumstances.

Another option to the driving conditions you described is to slow down. During inclimate weather, especially when roads are wet or snow covered and icy, reduced speeds are always advisable.


Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2012
Article comment by: this should help .....

With newer cars, it only takes a couple inches of pooled water underneath to trigger the car's computer sensor, and bring the vehicle to an immediate halt. But if that had happened to you on Gordon Drive, the cop probably would have written you a citation for that, instead. Obviously, during times of heavy rain, you should leave the car in your garage, and walk.

Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2012
Article comment by: anonymous anonymous

Guess posting this will make you feel better when you pay that ticket! Avoiding a mud puddle, water puddle is not in the statute! Guess one might ask if the question was on a drivers test and your passing to be able to drive what would you answer? Getting angry will not make the ticket go away!

Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2012
Article comment by: Anson's Nephew

"Yes, I could travel 35 mph through the puddles and cause wet and useless brakes and lack of vision for myself and, if there is oncoming traffic, throw large amounts of dirty water and loose gravel on my fellow drivers."

Or you could slow down so that you don't throw water on approaching vehicles and proceed cautiously because you never know what dangers could be beneath the water. Oh wait, that would indicate an understanding of "defensive drving."


Posted: Sunday, December 16, 2012
Article comment by: Long Time Resident

Or you could slow down and procede cautiously. This would be safe. I think maybe you swerving around the puddle may have had more to do with you not wanting puddle water on your vehicle.



Article Comment Submission Form
Comments are not posted immediately. Submissions must adhere to our Use of Service Terms of Use agreement. Rambling or nonsensical comments may not be posted. Comments are limited to Facebook character limits. In order for us to reasonably manage this feature we may limit excessive comment entries.
Submit an Article Comment
First Name:
Required
Last Name:
Required
Telephone:
Required
Email:
Required
Comment:
Required
Passcode:
Required
Anti-SPAM Passcode Click here to see a new mix of characters.
This is an anti-SPAM device. It is not case sensitive.
   


Advanced Search

Find more about Weather in Kingman, AZ
Click for weather forecast



Find it Features Blogs Milestones Extras Submit Other Publications Local Listings
Real Estate Search | Classifieds | Place an Ad | Find Kingman Jobs | Kingman Chamber | e-News | Contact Us | RSS | Site Map
© Copyright 2016 Western News&Info, Inc.® The Kingman Daily Miner is the information source for Kingman and surrounding area communities in Northern Arizona. Original content may not be reprinted or distributed without the written permission of Western News&Info, Inc.® Kingman Daily Miner Online is a service of WNI. By using the Site, kdminer.com ®, you agree to abide and be bound by the Site's terms of use and Privacy Policy, which prohibit commercial use of any information on the Site. Click here to email your questions, comments or suggestions. Kingman Daily Miner Online is a proud publication of Western News&Info, Inc.® All Rights Reserved.


Software © 1998-2016 1up! Software, All Rights Reserved