White separatist to retire in Mohave County<BR>

Dennis Mahon, one of the most powerful leaders of white supremacist organization known as the White Aryan Resistance, has set his sights on moving to Kingman.

He said he is retiring from the cause of which he has been at the forefront for the past 20 years.

Mahon, who is living temporarily in Gilbert, said he plans to move within the next few weeks to a small home near Kingman he is renting.

He would not say where the home is but did say it was about 10 miles outside of Kingman.

"I'm retired," Mahon said.

"After 22 years of revolutionary activity, it's time for someone else to pull the plow.

I'm not going to be involved in anything political - period.

I'm not organizing anything.

I'm retired from the movement.

I'm not involved in any activity.

I'm not going to build bombs.

I'm going to get my health back, retire and make a living wage "

Formerly of Oklahoma, Mahon, 50, would not say what he plans to do to make a living.

He also said once he moves here he would probably go in disguise and use a fake name for the first few months he is here.

In the future, he said he might buy a few acres of land.

Mahon said he met Timothy McVeigh several times at gun shows and is considered a supporter of the Army veteran and death row inmate.

He said McVeigh was definitely involved in the 1995 bombing of a federal building in Oklahoma City.

McVeigh lived in the Kingman area periodically from 1994 to early 1995.

He is scheduled to be executed June 11 but has filed an appeal for a delay of execution.

A hearing on that appeal will be held Wednesday.

McVeigh was convicted and sentenced to death for the April 19, 1995, explosion that ripped apart the Alfred P.

Murrah federal building and killed 168 people, 19 of them children.

"I met him in Tulsa at a gun show in 1993 in April or May," Mahon said.

"We talked about Waco (the deadly FBI raid of a religious cult compound in Waco, Texas) for a few minutes.

I was going to give him a calling card, but I didn't have any with me.

Thank God.

I might have been arrested along with him later."

Mahon said McVeigh was selling army uniforms, bayonets and had several hundred copies of "The Turner Diaries," a controversial book that advocates overthrowing the government.

"I respect the man for the courage it took him," Mahon said.

"His motives were right."

Mahon said there were three or four others involved in the bombing but would not say who they are.

"(McVeigh is) protecting them," he said.

"He's protecting his fellow soldiers.

You don't run a revolution by killing civilians.

If it were full of FBI or ATF agents, he would have been a hero.

He made a mistake by killing civilians.

You don't kill children.

He should have bombed the building at 3 in the morning.

Tim McVeigh took it to the Great Satan, the federal government, big time.

I respected him very much."

Following in the footsteps of McVeigh, Mahon said he is moving to the Kingman area because of the population of rural residents who believe in the same anti-taxes, anti-government philosophy.

"McVeigh was right," he said.

"Kingman is the place to go.

McVeigh said it had the best climate, the best scenery.

The most anti-taxes, white people."

Mahon estimates there are several thousand people in Mohave County and several hundred thousand people throughout the state who share his views.

"I'm not a white supremacist," Mahon said.

"I'm a white separatist.

I stand for the white, working people.

The anti-tax, anti-government, anti-growth, proud, white people."

Mahon said he would like to see a white Aryan state, possible made up of five to 10 states in the Northwest and the upper Midwest part of the country set aside for whites.

"It's time for the white race to be punished by God and nature," he said.

"Any race that destroys itself through abortion and birth control.

The white race is committing suicide through abortion and birth control.

It's almost too late for the white race."

Mahon also suggested giving the 100 miles just north of the Mexican border to the mixed races.

"Ninety percent of just north of the border is mestizo anyway," he said.

"Arizona's major problem is water," he said.

"We're running out of water.

With double the population, there is not enough water to support that population.

Southern Arizona can't take any more growth.

If immigration is not stopped, we will have a water disaster here."

Mahon admitted protesting the 1991 Gulf War and criticized the U.S.

government for supplying weapons to Israel against the Arabs.

He has allied himself with Osama bin Laden, the Saudi terrorist believed behind the U.S.

Embassy bombings in Africa.

He also said Iraq has given him $120,000 since 1991.