Kingman man to lend a hand in New York

Dennis Snider is not getting his hopes up that survivors may still be alive in the wreckage of the World Trade Center towers in New York City.

But he is among rescuers going through the rubble today as the rescue and recovery operation continues.

Snider is a Kingman resident who has worked for the Clark County (Nevada) Fire Department for the last 21 years.

He is a captain and has worked in Laughlin for the past six years.

Snider and 63 other members of Nevada Task Force 1 left for New York City on Wednesday afternoon.

While most of the unit's personnel are with the Clark County Fire Department, there also are some doctors, Las Vegas Metro police officers and structural engineers in the group.

"I'll be digging in the rubble, looking for victims," Snider said.

"As you know, it's pretty late to find survivors so I'll probably help bring some of our brothers out."

The Clark County Fire Department is one of 28 national urban search and rescue teams attached to the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

He was a member of Clark County Search and Rescue for five years, Snider said.

Snider was mixing business with pleasure in Canada when terrorists crashed commercial airliners into the World Trade Center and Pentagon on Sept.

11.

He was vacationing with his wife, Julie, and children, Dakota and Tenaya, who attend Hualapai Elementary School.

He also was competing with three other members of the Clark County Fire Department in the Sea 2 Summit, a 160-kilometer adventure race that combines kayaking, mountain biking and trail racing from Vancouver to Whistler.

His four-member team finished 30th among 69 teams in the event with a time of about 21 hours, Snider said.

"When it happened that Tuesday morning I pretty much knew we'd be going to New York, but as we were in Canada I figured the unit would leave without me," Snider said.

"We got back on Sunday (Sept.

16) and received activation orders.

Snider said Nevada Task Force 1 will do a 10-day rotation at "ground zero."

Snider's unit was put on alert after the Oklahoma City bombing, but never deployed, Julie Snider said.

She was asked how she felt about her husband assisting in the rescue effort at ground zero.

"I'm proud but at the same time concerned for my husband," Julie said.

"This is real and I want to keep him home.

"But this is his choice.

He's doing it for his country, himself and for those in New York."