County property tax revenues rising despite rate staying flat

While the county's primary property tax rate remains flat at $1.75 per $100 in assessed valuation, revenue is projected to increase $479,210 this fiscal year, according to Mohave County Assessor Bev Payne.

Revenue from the property tax is expected to rise because of population growth and building activity, she said.

The county has about 24,000 parcels on its tax rolls.

"You take a look at (development on) Stockton Hill Road," she said.

Payne said revenue is expected to grow by 5.3 percent for the 2002-2003 fiscal year, which started July 1.

She projects $18.2 million in property tax revenue.

The assessed value countywide is expected to rise from $991.8 million in 2001-2002 to more than $1 billion this fiscal year.

The property tax revenue goes into the county's general fund, which pays for county operations and services.

The county supervisors on Monday adopted a $178.8 million budget for this fiscal year, up nearly $30 million from 2001-2002.

Because property tax revenue is increasing, the county is required under the state truth-in-taxation law to notify the public through legal advertising, Payne said.

The county treasurer's office, which adjoins Payne's office, serves as the tax collection agency for the county, fire, school and other special districts.

The primary tax rate remains at $1.75 because the county supervisors have been unable to raise the rate or increase the county sales tax by a quarter-percent.

County Manager Ron Walker had recommended raising property taxes by 21.94 cents on $100 in assessed valuation and doubling the sales tax to increase revenue for general fund operations.

Supervisor Buster Johnson of Lake Havasu City thwarted efforts to raise the sales tax, which requires a 3-0 vote.

Supervisors Pete Byers of Kingman and Tom Sockwell of Bullhead City would have voted to raise the primary property tax rate only if Johnson had agreed to hiking the sales tax.

A property tax hike requires a 2-1 vote.

"I think it is going to remain the same," Byers said of property taxes.

"We are not going to raise it."

Both Byers and Payne indicated the public got the wrong impression of the legal advertising, which led some people to believe that the primary property tax rate was increasing.

"It creates confusion," he said.

The supervisors are scheduled to conduct a public hearing Monday about property tax rates for the county and other taxing districts.

The meeting starts at 9:30 a.m.

and takes place in the boardroom at 809 E.

Beale St.

The supervisors are scheduled to adopt the new levy rates when they meet Aug.

19.