I-40 interchanges, access to east Kingman focus of transportation meeting<BR>

Interstate 40 interchanges and improved access to east Kingman were the focus of comments Thursday during an open house for Kingman residents with a special interest in traffic.

Kingman resident Dan Minjares attended the meeting about the Kingman Area Transportation Study to check out plans to improve intersections along Stockton Hill Road near I-40, including Beverly Avenue.

"My daughter was injured in a motorcycle accident at Beverley Avenue recently," Minjares said.

"Some changes need to be made there."

A vehicle towing a trailer turned left onto southbound Stockton Hill Road and collided with the motorcycle, which ended up under the trailer, Minjares said.

The study presents several options for improvements in traffic in that area.

Parson's Brinckerhoff, a Phoenix traffic consulting firm, showed drawings of an urban interchange along Interstate 40 at Stockton Hill Road that would be an Arizona Department of Transportation project.

It is not yet on the ADOT five-year plan.

Another option would involve widening Stockton Hill Road to six lanes between Detroit Avenue just south of I-40 and Airway Avenue about a half mile to the north.

Dan Hartig, Parsons Brinckerhoff spokesman, said that kind of widening costs $2.5 million per mile plus any right of way purchases.

Still another option would be the building of one-way service roads north and south of I-40 between Stockton Hill Road and Harrison Street, replacing Beverly Avenue north of the interstate and adding a street to the south.

Building I-40 underpasses at Fairgrounds Boulevard and Western Avenue are other options to improve traffic flow through the area.

All these projects involve the ADOT and some would have to be approved by federal highway agencies.

Kingman Community Development Director Dennis Roberts said the widening of Stockton Hill Road would likely be the most expensive street project in Kingman to date.

The Kingman Area Transportation Study also looks at more ways to cross the Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway.

The railroad heads northeast into Kingman and turns east through downtown before turning northeast again and dividing the rest of the city.

North of downtown, there are just three ways across the railroad besides I-40: an overpass along Hualapai Mountain Road, a grade crossing at Louise Avenue and an underpass in the Kingman Airport Industrial Park.

The study proposes a downtown underpass at Topeka Street explains three options to replace the grade crossing at Louise Avenue, one of them being an extension of Harrison Street.

A proposed underpass at Airway Avenue was regarded as already planned and therefore not part of the new planning Roberts said.

Two options for an I-40 interchange near the east city the limits are shown in the study.

One would connect to a new street between Rancho Santa Fe and the state land west of the subdivision.

The second option at Rattlesnake Wash would connect to a new road east of Rancho Santa Fe.

Both options could include service roads along both sides of I-40.

Changes in the I-40 interchange at Beale Street and U.S.

93 north show a bypass from White Cliffs past Beale Springs to connect near the Kingman city limits.

For the grid of streets in the Hilltop area, the study would improve Airway, Airfield, and Southern avenues and Central, Seneca and Cherokee streets.

The study is meant to provide a basis for road and street construction by Mohave County, ADOT and the city of Kingman over the next 10 to 20 years.

Periodic updates are included, Roberts said.