Rattlesnake Wash on track for 2012

KINGMAN – Rattlesnake Wash Interchange project managers gave residents a glimpse into plans to improve East Kingman access Tuesday night. Representatives from the Arizona Department of Transportation hosted the open house for public input, one of the first steps in completing a design concept report to put the project on track for 2012.

The project is a joint effort between ADOT, the city of Kingman and the Federal Highway Administration for a new Interstate 40 Interchange accessing East Kingman, relieving growing congestion on Andy Devine Avenue and linking a four-lane road from the interchange connecting Louise Avenue, Airway Avenue and the Industrial Park.

Completing the concept report involves a 14-month process incorporating engineering studies and environmental impact analysis, said Dale Wiggins, the consultant project manager with URS Corporation, the design consultants hired by ADOT for the project. Wiggins said part of the objective is to provide a beltway connecting the Industrial Park area to Hualapai Mountain Road, divided into two phases of the overall project.

The City of Kingman and ADOT would collaborate on the first phase of the project – the four-lane road Wiggins identified as Mohave Drive connecting Louise Avenue and Industrial Park from the interchange.

The second phase would extend Mohave Drive down to Hualapai Mountain Road, of which the city of Kingman would assume full responsibility for project completion, he said.

Wiggins said that keeping the project scoped for 2012 in light of increasing construction costs was one aspect addressed while completing the final report for federal review, though the funding agreement would hold stipulating Kingman to front roughly 30 percent of the costs and the state of Arizona to cover the rest.

Wiggins added that the city’s pursuit of an interchange at Kingman Crossing has no bearing on the Rattlesnake project getting on the next five-year plan, since that project is mostly a private-funding venture.

If private investment were to come into play for Rattlesnake, that could speed up the process, he added.

Wiggins identified two possible obstacles to the project: identifying the corridor of the first phase (the Kingman Airport Authority is expected to master-plan the area in the next year or two, he said), and Kingman acquiring the necessary right of way for the southern end of Mohave Drive.

Wiggins said ADOT would hold another public meeting in August.