KRMC nurse has memorable Halloween

Helping lost Alzheimer’s patient get home to Fort Worth all in a day’s work for Musgrove

Annette Musgrove, left, registered nurse in the emergency room at Kingman Regional Medical Center, shows nursing extern Bruce Holbrook how to access patient information in the triage room. Photo: TERRY ORGAN/Miner

Annette Musgrove, left, registered nurse in the emergency room at Kingman Regional Medical Center, shows nursing extern Bruce Holbrook how to access patient information in the triage room. Photo: TERRY ORGAN/Miner

KINGMAN - Annette Musgrove will long remember Halloween.

Musgrove is a registered nurse who works in the emergency room at Kingman Regional Medical Center. She was pulling a dayshift Oct. 31 when a 78-year-old man with Alzheimer's disease was brought in by ambulance from the Petro Plaza east of Kingman.

The man's name can't be revealed due to patient confidentiality laws. He had been reported missing to Fort Worth, Texas, police about 24 hours earlier by family members.

"He was in a pretty confused state when he got off a bus at Petro," Musgrove said. "People there felt he was in an altered mental status and called 911, which brought him here."

Kingman Police were called and officer Wayne Hollon responded to KRMC. The man was given a triage-type exam and nothing was found wrong with him physically.

While he was being examined, Hollon took the man's driver's license and ran a computer check. He found the missing person's report from Fort Worth Police.

Musgrove and Hollon spent about two hours calling family members and trying to arrange transportation home for the elderly man.

"The family had learned he got on a bus heading in our direction," Musgrove said. "A granddaughter is a stewardess and she changed flights to get into Las Vegas in hopes of contacting him there.

"We contacted her and talked about how to get her grandfather to Las Vegas. Buses and shuttles had finished their runs for the day, so we arranged a cab ride (paid for by KRMC) to (McCarran Airport)."

About 7:45 p.m., the cab left KRMC. About 10:15 p.m., the granddaughter called to tell Musgrove she had met her grandfather and was putting him on a flight to Fort Worth.

A call from the family came into the KRMC emergency room about 2:40 a.m. Nov. 1 saying the man was home and safely tucked in bed, Musgrove said.

"I spoke with the granddaughter, daughter and wife of the man and all were very grateful," she said. "I was tickled pink he got home safely."

Janet Gode, director of emergency services at KRMC, said she got a call during the evening apprising her of what was going on.

"Annette handled the situation with compassion," Gode said. "She'll just say she was doing her job.

"Some people would have said he's discharged and not my responsibility, but she stayed overtime until the cab arrived. She went above and beyond what I expect of one of our nurses."

Musgrove has been in the nursing field for 10 years. She was a licensed practical nurse for five years before obtaining R.N. status she has held the past five years.

She has worked for six years at KRMC, the first three on the third floor and the last three in the emergency room.

"I just felt like it was the right thing to do," Musgrove said. "Everybody here was willing to help out.

"What I did was nothing you learn in nursing school."