Fonda residents not fond of idea

City may reopen road it closed two years ago at the request of Walleck homeowners due to noise, dust

This section of North Glen Road was closed about two years ago after several residents from Walleck Ranch complained about the dust and noise from traffic. The city is considering reopening and improving North Glen Road between Airway and Gordon avenues to help alleviate traffic on Stockton Hill Road. Photo: SUZANNE ADAMS/ Miner

This section of North Glen Road was closed about two years ago after several residents from Walleck Ranch complained about the dust and noise from traffic. The city is considering reopening and improving North Glen Road between Airway and Gordon avenues to help alleviate traffic on Stockton Hill Road. Photo: SUZANNE ADAMS/ Miner

KINGMAN - Residents on Henry Fonda Way are surprised and angered about the possibility of North Glen Road being opened to through traffic.

The city is considering opening and paving the road from Airway Avenue to Gordon Avenue. It is believed that opening the street could reduce the amount of traffic on Stockton Hill Road.

Several small sections of North Glen Road are already paved, including a section between Home Depot and a series of homes on Henry Fonda Way, which is part of the Walleck Ranch subdivision. The back yards of many of the houses butt up against a closed, paved section of North Glen Road.

That would be bad enough but houses along Henry Fonda Way sit about four feet below the grade of the road.

All of the houses have a cinderblock privacy wall in their backyard.

Many of the residents have increased the height of their back walls to protect their privacy.

"It would be awful if they opened it. We really don't have any privacy. The road comes right up to the edge of our wall," resident Kendra Carroll said.

"It's the danger factor. Someone could just jump over the wall or there could be an accident," said Debbie Torres, a resident on Henry Fonda Way. "It's such a nice neighborhood. It would really be kind of a drag if they opened it."

Torres said she understood the traffic situation on Stockton Hill Road. She often takes back streets to pick her son up from school.

Opening North Glen Road wouldn't help matters any, she said. There isn't a problem with traffic at that point on Stockton Hill Road.

"The traffic jam starts at Airway Avenue and runs until Detroit Avenue," she said.

"The cars used to zoom right past here when it was open before," Bev O'Neil said. She sometimes hears motorcycles race down the closed street.

Kevin O'Neil said the family had raised the cinderblock wall in the back yard once.

"I think the city should pay or make Home Depot pay if we have to raise our walls again," he said.

"They better not open it," said Ruth Angle. When she and her husband, Gary, bought their home, the Realtor didn't say too much about the road or Home Depot. The road was closed when they bought the house. An ex-police officer told them it would never be reopened.

Dorothy Halterman just moved into a home on Henry Fonda Way two weeks ago.

"Oh, that would just be awful," she said. "All that dust and noise."

"It's going to be boondoggle," Robert Maderick said. Robert and his wife, Rita, have lived on Henry Fonda Way since the development was first built. The couple was instrumental in getting the road closed in the first place. They were told that the road would only be an access road for utility trucks when they bought their home.

It quickly turned into a construction road for The Home Depot.

Big, heavy-duty construction trucks would rumble along behind their house at all hours of the day and night, sending dust and dirt flying, Rita Maderick said. After The Home Depot opened, the road was used for deliveries.

The Madericks and a few other residents approached City Council about the problem. At the time, Monica Gates was mayor, and the Madericks said she listened to their problem and was able to get the road closed.

The Madericks said they were promised the road would never be reopened.

There is a wash just before Gordon Avenue. The Madericks were told it would cost too much to build the culverts and bridges necessary to go over the wash and connect the road with Gordon Avenue.

"I don't know how they're going to do it," Robert Maderick said.

The city would have to grade the road down to the level of their yards, he said, and doing so might open the city up to a lawsuit. According to the building code, the developer of Walleck Ranch should have graded the homes to the proper level but didn't, and the city didn't require it, Robert Maderick said.

"It doesn't make any sense. They never should have allowed it in the first place," Rita Maderick said.

The couple said they would return to Council if the city attempted to open the street, and this time they might have more company.