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Trusted local news leader for Kingman, Arizona & Mohave County
6:46 AM Tue, Nov. 20th

Should I join Hollywood in the writers' strike?

I shouldn't even be writing this.

I should be out on the picket lines with my brethren writers - those brave souls willing to give up their careers so those who come after them can have their slice of the profit pie.

True, the average sitcom writer makes more than 10 times what I do every year. However, my career can span decades or until I fabricate a story about some "nappy headed hoes." And then comes the book deal.

If history repeats itself, these dedicated members of the Writers Guild of America can go 22 weeks without work. According to the Associated Press, the chief negotiator for the producers union said it indeed could be a while before an agreement is made.

Who cares about the more than $500 million in losses facing the entertainment industry? I'm sure Universal Pictures can live off of the $43.6 million in gross sales from the opening weekend of "American Gangster."

Or how about more than $336.5 million in box office sales "Spider-Man 3" brought in by Columbia Pictures? The big companies will survive.

In a cutthroat business that often leaves writers high and dry when they hit their 30s, how can you not support them?

Damn the man - in this case the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers - and fight the power!

I live check by check. I cannot imagine going a week, let alone months, without pay. At least others in the industry are compassionate and supportive.

Actor John Stamos told AP that the cast of "ER" planned to raise money for crew members who might have trouble making car and mortgage payments if the strike goes on. I understand where they are coming from. Technology changes.

I myself have watched television shows and movies online. The concept never even crossed my mind last year, and yet it doesn't seem strange at all now.

I can see how even year-old contracts cannot be up to date to include the latest technology. I understand how writers want some of the profits when shows are offered on the Internet.

Six-figure salaries may not be in my near future. Neither may be "Desperate Housewives," "Carpoolers," "Back to You," "Til Death," "Rules of Engagement," "Two and a Half Men" and "The Big Bang Theory."

I'm fine with that. They can throw more and more irrelevant reality TV programs on.

I'll read a book. It's a novel - pun intended - concept, I know.