Computer club offers opportunity to 'geek out'

MCC/Courtesy<br>
MC4 member Robert Lawrence participates with other members of the community at a Local Area Network computer gaming cooperative and competitive evening in April of 2007 at Mohave Community College.

MCC/Courtesy<br> MC4 member Robert Lawrence participates with other members of the community at a Local Area Network computer gaming cooperative and competitive evening in April of 2007 at Mohave Community College.

KINGMAN - Pwned. It's something you want to have, and you might just hear it at the Mohave Community College Computer Club's Local Area Network gaming nights.

mination during a competition, akin to what the computer club holds at the J. Leonard and Grace Neal Campus in Kingman.

MC4 has been in existence in one form or another during the past 20 years at the Kingman campus. It has seen revitalization during the past five years, Andra Goldberg said.

Beyond her work as Computer Information Systems course coordinator and faculty at MCC, Goldberg serves as co-advisor for the club. She has seen the revitalization from the beginning and attributes it to SunGard Higher Education, the technical support company for MCC.

The club has 20 active members on the roster, Brian Siemens said. Siemens is the user support services manager for MCC and co-advisor for the club. "It allows them to get together to collaborate on projects, gaming and computer issues," Siemens said. "It's something that they don't learn in classes."

The club meetings and LAN gaming give the members an opportunity to share their experience.

"It gives them a venue to deal with some of the computer technology that may not be covered in the curriculum," Siemens said.

While the club usually meets once a month, it varies from campus to campus, said Rob Anderson, audio/visual specialist at the Kingman campus.

Matt Butcher, CIS instructor, is the advisor for the club at the Henry Campus in Bullhead City. At the Bullhead City campus, the focus is currently on computer programming, Anderson said.

While the club wasn't directly responsible for the addition of computer programming classes at MCC, it was a factor in the decision, Anderson said. He has been involved with introductory computer programming classes at MCC. "We had people just come up with brilliant games," Anderson said. "I was just like, 'Whoa,' and I'm the instructor."

The club has seen a direct impact on attendance in technology classes at MCC. Often the attendees want to learn how to set up their own LAN.

The club's roster varies from semester to semester. While it is primarily made up of MCC students, it is open to the whole community, Siemens said.

"It lets the kids with varying interests together with other kids with similar interests," Siemens said.

Some of the members include high school students and former MCC students. What really brings them out and attracts new members are the club's LAN gaming nights.

The club holds LAN gaming twice a semester, attracting people from throughout the county. An average of 30 people usually attend, though they have seen more than 50 people during some evenings. "Pretty much all members we've seen at events five years ago," Anderson said. "We have students that have graduated come back to enter LAN events."

LAN gaming gathers people and their computers together for playing multiplayer computer games on a network. LAN gaming at MCC has also included video game systems from Xbox 360 to the Nintendo Wii for "Halo 3" and "Guitar Hero" play.

"It's an amazing process," said Jim Luke, vice chancellor of information technology. "Every time I come, I'm just blown away."

While the club can tap into the computers and large screens at the computer lab after hours, individuals often bring in their own equipment.

There is high interest from the community when they hold the LAN gaming, and often participants want to continue after the designated deadline, Luke said. Sometimes they pack up their computers and continue the activities at their residences.