MedCath hospitals garner high ratings

Builders of new Kingman facility recognized for cardiovascular care

KINGMAN - Five of MedCath Corporation's nine hospitals have been honored as being among the nation's 100 top hospitals for cardiovascular care.

The corporation based out of Charlotte, N.C., owns an interest in and operates nine hospitals in Arizona, Arkansas, California, Louisiana, New Mexico, South Dakota, and Texas. It is currently building Hualapai Mountain Medical Center in Kingman.

HMMC, 3801 Santa Rosa Drive, is scheduled for completion during the fall of 2009.

Having been built out, Lott Brothers Construction is currently focusing construction on the interior of the building. The $70-million development is located north of Interstate 40 in east Kingman.

The cardiovascular care results released last Monday placed Arizona Heart Hospital in Phoenix, the Louisiana Medical Center and Heart Hospital in Lacombe, La., the Avera Heart Hospital of South Dakota in Sioux Falls, Heart Hospital of Austin, Texas, and the Harlingen Medical Center, Texas, on the list.

"What this doesn't point out is that Lafayette Hospital was one of our hospitals during the same period, so actually we were 6 for 10," said Ed French, president and chief executive officer of MedCath. " I don't know that there's anybody else in the country who can claim a percentage even close to this number of having their hospitals in the Top 100."

In its 10th year, the study marks the fifth time Arizona Heart Hospital has received the honor, the fourth time for Heart Hospital of Austin and the third time for Avera Heart Hospital of South Dakota.

The annual list, by Thomson Reuters, measured cardiovascular hospitals with lower rates of mortalities and complications. The study is based on hospitals' performance treating four kinds of emergencies: heart failure, heart attacks, bypass surgeries and angioplasties.

The full list is available online at Modern Healthcare magazine's Web site, www.modernhealthcare.com.

Thomson Reuters examined the clinical outcomes of patients at 970 hospitals and found, for example, that the mortality rate for bypass surgery was 26 percent lower in the 100 Top Hospitals.

The study also found that, on average, the top hospitals cost $1,542 less a case.

"It's an honor that five of our nine hospitals have received this prestigious ranking, because it recognizes the one measure that matters most: quality care," French said. "Studies repeatedly show that our patient-focused model has helped lead to lower mortality rates, shorter lengths of stay and a higher rate of being discharged directly home."