Letter: Voices of the average not being heard

I can't say I was surprised at the response to my letter of Nov. 26 concerning the tasks being put on our educational system, sometimes to the harm of the regular education students. In no way am I undermining the special-needs child. My hope is that all the children have the ability to reach their full potential. As caring parents and grandparents, anything less is a disgrace.

I am closely involved with three very caring teachers who have struggled with these issues for years. The problem isn't teaching the non-disabled students or the special-needs child, but to obtain balance so neither is cheated of an education. First of all, the majority of special-needs children can be mainstreamed into regular classes without disruption. The children may need extra personnel in the classroom to ensure a quality education for all, but this is unfortunately not happening a majority of the time. Secondly, you have the child who is a constant disruption to the classroom so that all the students are cheated of an atmosphere that supports a maximum learning opportunity. This is the child that needs to be separated to provide him/her with a quiet and safe place where education can take place for all the children.

It seems to me, when there is a special interest group, their voices are being heard loud and clear, but the average person is somehow being silenced, almost made to feel guilty about being average or mainstream. We all have a voice and need to be heard, not to the detriment of anyone but to the advantage of all.

Maryanne Meyer

Kingman