The big storm still to come

Tuesday night’s rainstorm produced ponds and lakes throughout the city

JC AMBERLYN/Miner

The storm that hit Kingman Tuesday evening dumped a lot of rain on the town, and driving was hazardous in many parts of the city. A car drives on Route 66 in downtown Kingman.

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JC AMBERLYN/Miner The storm that hit Kingman Tuesday evening dumped a lot of rain on the town, and driving was hazardous in many parts of the city. A car drives on Route 66 in downtown Kingman. <a href="http://kingmandailyminer.com/Formlayout.asp?formcall=userform&form=20">Click here to purchase this photo</a>

KINGMAN - A flood watch will be in effect through Friday as another storm front moves into the area today, bringing with it possibly even more rain than previously seen this week.

Forecasters predict that the most significant rainfall since Sunday night will begin this afternoon and continue well into the evening.

Parts of Kingman saw as much as 1 ½-inches of rain during storms Tuesday evening. More than 2 ½-inches of rain fell in Cedar Hills, according to the Mohave County flood warning system.

The flood warning system generated 17 automated alarms for heavy rainfall between 7:43 p.m. and 9:53 p.m. Tuesday.

Seven alarms were in the Kingman area, four in the Golden Valley area, three in the Bullhead City/Mohave Valley area, one near Dolan Springs, one near Oatman and one northeast of Wikieup.

The rain closed a portion of Bank Street between Gordon and Northern Avenue Tuesday evening, while a portion of eastbound I-40 at the south U.S. 93 junction was closed from 10 p.m. to 3 a.m.

The Mohave County Road Department spent most of Wednesday sweeping debris off the road and re-establishing shoulders, but no significant flooding problems were reported by the Mohave County Sheriff's Office or the Kingman Police Department.

Thursday's storm could bring anywhere from 1 to 3 inches of rain. Some parts of northern Arizona will see up to 40 inches of snow. The Hualapai Mountains should see several feet of snow before the end of the week.

This week's storms are the result of a classic El Nino weather pattern in which a shift in the jet stream is followed by a series of storms, although forecasters have called the storm unusual because of its size and scope.