Owner of eyesore has until Friday to clean it up

ERIN TAYLOR/Miner -- Raindance Traders, a popular store on Beale Street easily recognized by its purple façade, burned down May 7. Debris has since sat at the location, with noticeable graffiti on some of the still-standing walls.

ERIN TAYLOR/Miner -- Raindance Traders, a popular store on Beale Street easily recognized by its purple façade, burned down May 7. Debris has since sat at the location, with noticeable graffiti on some of the still-standing walls.

KINGMAN - The owner of the former site of Raindance Traders has until the end of the day Friday to clean the site where the store was destroyed by fire back in May.

The owner of the property, David Freeland Jr., picked up a demolition permit issued by the city of Kingman Aug. 19. He has since contracted with Bulldog Disposal, and a Dumpster currently sits on the edge of the property.

Attempts to reach Freeland for this story were unsuccessful. He owned the building for some 30 years.

A representative with the city's Building Department said Freeland applied for, and was granted, the demolition permit back at the beginning in June, but ran into several problems before the property could be cleared.

One of those problems included asbestos, said Kingman Assistant Fire Chief Doug Bradley. After that was properly removed, Freeland apparently ran into financial issues in clearing the site.

Bradley said there was no insurance on the business, which was destroyed by fire just after the close of business May 7. The cause of the fire was determined to be an electrical cord that had shorted out in the office area.

The fire caused the roof to collapse quickly after the fire started.

Raindance Traders was a popular destination for locals and tourists passing through Beale Street on their way to Las Vegas. The store sold a number of unique items, including hand-crafted Native American jewelry and one-of-a-kind bric-a-brac.

Bradley said property owners in similar circumstances normally have 30 days to either secure their site with fencing or have it completely cleared. He characterized Freeland as cooperative in working with officials through the various issues to get the site cleaned.

If the property is not cleared by the end of the day Friday, the city may take legal action.