Carlos Elmer Photography Contest to be on display

Courtesy<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->Last year’s Carlos Elmer Photo Contest winners pose with their pictures and prizes. From left: Savanna Weninger, Maria Williams, Kate Arnold, Laura Boatman and Dakota Snider.<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 --><br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->

Courtesy<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->Last year’s Carlos Elmer Photo Contest winners pose with their pictures and prizes. From left: Savanna Weninger, Maria Williams, Kate Arnold, Laura Boatman and Dakota Snider.<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 --><br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->

KINGMAN - It is time for the 13th annual Carlos Elmer Photography Contest.

On Thursday, Kingman High's photography classes - taught by Kate Arnold - will set up a display of the various black and white Arizona landscapes submitted for this year's contest at the Powerhouse. The show will open to the public Friday and will run through May 11.

Judges include local photographers Bill Schilling, Bill Eckstrom and Daryl Heinitz. First-, second- and third-place prizes of $125, $80 and $50, respectively, were donated by Elmer's family, who sponsor the show.

There are 40 pieces in this year's competition. All KHS photography students can enter, and each contestant is allowed to enter more than one piece.

The show is not just for advanced photography students, explained Arnold. In fact, about ten years ago a beginning student who did a beautiful job won first place, she said.

There is a permanent exhibit of Elmer's work on the second floor of the Powerhouse. The contest helps recognize and pay tribute to the famous photographer's work, said Arnold. Many of the late photographer's pictures were published in the magazine Arizona Highways over the years. He published several books as well, including "London Bridge in Pictures" and "Arizona in Color."

When Elmer lived, he often shared his expertise with Kingman High's Photography program by demonstrating techniques and showing off his work, said Arnold.

Elmer shot with film, and for years the contest was strictly film. Technology's exponential rise prompted Arnold to switch the contest to digital. She had reservations when doing this because she did not want to undermine Elmer's legacy, so she asked Elmer's son Frank how he felt about it. He was all for the change.

Arnold maintains contact with Elmer's family and is responsible for assigning the landscape project to her photography classes.

"We believe Mr. Elmer would be pleased with the results," Arnold said.