New McDonald's to bring 70 jobs to Kingman

AHRON SHERMAN/Miner<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->Preparations for the new McDonald’s on the 3400 block of Stockton Hill Road are under way. The store should be completed within three months.

AHRON SHERMAN/Miner<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->Preparations for the new McDonald’s on the 3400 block of Stockton Hill Road are under way. The store should be completed within three months.

KINGMAN - In 90 days, Kingman will have its third McDonald's, which is expected to bring 70-80 job openings to the community.

Unlike the other two, this McDonald's will feature a 900 square-foot, indoor playground and toddler section.

Abe Martinez, who owns all three Kingman McDonald's as well as 12 others in Arizona and Nevada with his wife, Tiffany, said the toddler section will have toys that play music once children push various buttons.

Think Fisher-Price "See 'n Say" toys.

Everything in the toddler section will be at a level children can reach, including a small slide.

The play area for older kids will have a large slide, a rock-climbing area and four arcade games since that is what kids like, said Martinez.

"Kingman [parents are] in need of something to take their families to do," Martinez said. "This will be a community-based restaurant."

The new McDonald's comes after two years of planning and waiting for the right location, said Martinez. It will be located on the 3400 block of Stockton Hill Road next to the empty Blockbuster building.

The location, however, may not be as good as Martinez thinks.

Kingman Police Department Captain Rusty Cooper said the stretch of Stockton Hill Road between Airway and Detroit Avenues has the highest rate of car accidents in Kingman. The concentration of restaurants, stores and vehicles in the area is at the root of the problem, said Cooper.

The city put in a raised median near Airway Avenue more than 10 years ago to stop cross-street traffic, which was one of the major reasons for all the accidents, explained Cooper.

Despite the questionable location and the fact that it will be Kingman's third McDonald's, it is still economic growth and will open up some jobs.

Kingman Chamber of Commerce Chairman Wesley Hassel said he is excited about any new economic growth in the community. For Martinez to put up a new McDonald's during an economic downturn shows his commitment to Kingman, said Hassel.

"Growth spurs growth," Hassel said.

One other issue the new McDonald's brings to the forefront deals with nutrition.

Deborah Conter, the nutrition promotion manager for Mohave County Public Health, said no food is bad in moderation, but if someone gets a fast food burger and fries every day, they will have to deal with serious health ramifications.

Fast food burgers and fries are full of saturated fat, which can lead to heart disease and obesity. There is also tons of sodium in fast food, and too much sodium can lead to hypertension, explained Conter.

Conter realizes that there is a proliferation of fast food restaurants in Kingman, but she said it is the individual's responsibility to eat right. People often eat food at home that is no better than what they get at McDonald's or Taco Bell, she said.

Even though the new McDonald's will be geared toward children and families, Conter said it is still the parent's responsibility to teach their kids how to make healthy choices.

Again, it comes down to what people decide to put in their children's bellies, said Conter. There is nothing wrong with parents taking their kids out to fast food restaurants once or twice a month, said Conter. The problems start when it happens several times a week. McDonald's started offering healthier choices, including salads, 1-percent milk and apple slices to its menu several years ago. Conter said that makes her happy, but she would like to see them add more.

"It is all about the choices people make," she said. "Even I enjoy a fast food burger once in awhile."