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OK, here's the catch - with pictures, too

DON MARTIN/For the Miner<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->This is the catch that the Lee family brought in during a trip on Saturday night with Outdoors writer and guide Don Martin. The foursome caught 133 fish.  From left, Kensen Lee, Ruby Lee and Jay Chan.

DON MARTIN/For the Miner<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->This is the catch that the Lee family brought in during a trip on Saturday night with Outdoors writer and guide Don Martin. The foursome caught 133 fish. From left, Kensen Lee, Ruby Lee and Jay Chan.

How many times have you heard the old adage that "All fishermen are liars and all liars are fishermen?"

In many cases that may be true, but when anglers have photos to prove their claims of big catches, the evidence is hard to refute.

Here is a tale of two fish stories, both that on their face may seem kind of unbelievable, but with photos, and the names of folks who were there, it is the truth.

Last week, we ran a photo of Golden Valley resident Dan Reed holding a huge striper that he caught at Lake Mohave. Dan was fishing with Kingman resident Dr. Jerry Sullivan when they caught a nice bunch of stripers - and some big channel catfish.

Well, Mr. Reed went back to Mohave on Saturday night.

Seems he went back with his fishing buddy again and had another big night.

They caught just nine stripers, but they were all good ones. Reed said their largest fish weighed 12.5 pounds and the smallest was 5.25 pounds. Reed said most of them were over 7 pounds.

They also caught 25 channel cats, with the largest being 8 pounds. Reed said most of the whisker fish were over 4 pounds.

Reed wouldn't say exactly where they were fishing, but he did note that they were fishing on Nevada side of the lake and they were in Cottonwood Basin. They are fishing in water that is 70-90 feet deep and are using cut up anchovies for bait.

They are fishing only at night.

Reed said they are using floating fishing lights, but they are not seeing many small bait fish. Most of the fish Reed has cleaned had crawdads in their stomachs.

Now here is another "fish story" that is absolutely the truth.

On Saturday night, I had the pleasure of fishing on Lake Mead with friend Jay Chan and our friends Kensen and Ruby Lee, who live in Las Vegas.

Due to the storms and Stockton Hill Road being closed, we didn't start fishing until 11 p.m.

Ruby caught the first striper within minutes of us starting, and from then on, it was literally a wide open bite.

By 3 a.m. we filled up FOUR fish ice chests, and the fish were still biting as fast as we could drop lines in the water.

Our final tally went like this. We had caught 129 stripers and four catfish in the short time we fished.

Our best fish weighed 2 pounds, 4 ounces, while our best 10 fish weighed 18 pounds, 14 ounces.

Remember, the "average" striper on Lake Mead - at least in the South Cove area - is 1.25 pounds, so these were better than average.

Our best 40, and that is the standard we use as it is used in the Stripe-R-Rama tournament to determine the winners, weighed 63 pounds, 6 ounces. To put it in perspective, this weight would have taken sixth place in the June Stripe-R-Rama tournament and earned you a check.

It took Jay and me about two hours to clean all of the fish for the Lees, and they ended up with more than 30 pounds of fresh filets.

Even with the monsoon storms, the fishing has remained great for stripers and catfish on Lake Mead.

As you read this, Jay and I are taking the cameraman and producer for my weekly outdoor television show, Back At Camp, on cable Channel 57, out on a night trip. Once again we'll be fishing out of South Cove. Hopefully, in the next few weeks we'll have a show you can watch to see just how we catch all those fish.