Dust caused by storms in Phoenix

'Outflow boundary' should settle or move out of area by today

JC AMBERLYN/Miner<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->haze that settled in Kingman Thursday. Photo taken from the Cerbat Mountains area south of Bullhead Mountain.<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->

JC AMBERLYN/Miner<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->haze that settled in Kingman Thursday. Photo taken from the Cerbat Mountains area south of Bullhead Mountain.<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->

KINGMAN - That hazy shade of late spring Thursday was caused by thunderstorms in Phoenix, according to the National Weather Service.

Meteorologist Larry Jensen out of Las Vegas said that the storms caused what is referred to as an "outflow boundary," which is the boundary separating air cooled by a storm, or the outflow, from the surrounding air. The outflow can travel hundreds of miles from its origin, picking up with it the dust that reduced visibility in northwest Arizona and parts of southern Nevada.

Jensen said he expects the dust to settle or move out of the area by today, although it could stick around as late as Saturday.

He added that the weekend forecast includes mostly sunny skies, with temperatures reaching right around 90 degrees.