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10:34 PM Sun, Nov. 18th

Somber and quiet, cyclists take to the streets of Kingman

RODNEY HAAS/Miner<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->A bicycle sits propped up against a rock in front of Kingman Academy Middle School Wednesday after 39 local bicyclists completed the Ride of Silence, a nationwide event that is designed to honor cyclists who have been injured or killed, while at the same time helping raise awareness to share the road with motorists. The cyclists completed a five-mile loop around Kingman, starting and finishing at KAMS.

RODNEY HAAS/Miner<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->A bicycle sits propped up against a rock in front of Kingman Academy Middle School Wednesday after 39 local bicyclists completed the Ride of Silence, a nationwide event that is designed to honor cyclists who have been injured or killed, while at the same time helping raise awareness to share the road with motorists. The cyclists completed a five-mile loop around Kingman, starting and finishing at KAMS.

With the sun setting on another warm spring day, they rode in a silent procession out of Kingman Academy Middle School - 39 bicyclists lined up one-by-one heading south down Harrison.

Some are young, others are old, some are cycling enthusiasts, and others are just casual riders. For some it's the first time they straddled a bike since they got their driver's licenses when they turned 16.

But regardless of who they are, they all have one thing in common. They either know someone who has been injured or killed while riding their bicycles on public roadways, or they have been injured or harassed while riding on the road.

But on this night, with the help of the Kingman Police Department's motorcycle patrol division, they ride to remember the estimated 600-700 bicyclists who are killed annually in the U.S. while riding on roadways.

On this night they number many but they ride as one in honor of those not with them - friends, mothers, fathers, sisters, and sons.

Their helmets on tight and sunglasses dark to cover their tears, they ride in silence to remember those they hold dear and to raise awareness that the road is there for all to share.

They ride on Andy Devine, where the KPD motorcycle patrol officers speed up to block streets to ensure that every one has a safe ride tonight.

They ride past the Reliant Mortgages electronic sign on the corner of Stockton Hill and Hope that reads, "Watch for Bicycles. Share the road."

They ride.

Approaching Stockton Hill Road and Detroit, they are greeted by oncoming motorists. Some pull to the side of the road, others simply stop in the street as they pay their respects to the fallen.

They ride on to Airway, where even more motorists have either pulled to the side of the road or simply stopped in their tracks. While the purpose of this night is to remember and raise awareness of the need to share the road, on this night motorists have simply given cyclists free rein on the roads.

They turn back onto Harrison; their five-mile journey through the streets of Kingman is almost over. They ride until they reach KAMS, where the journey began, and as each of the 39 riders return home, a bagpiper plays "Amazing Grace" to break the silence.

Welcome home.