Students get first-hand look at ASU

Engineering program designed for college transfers

MCC/Courtesy<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->Mohave Community College engineering students, from left, John MayBee, James Faucher, Cassie Jones and Nancy Fujikado stand in front of the Curiosity Mars rover on display at Arizona State University in Tempe. The students toured the university’s engineering transfer program. They all attend MCC’s Kingman campus.

MCC/Courtesy<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->Mohave Community College engineering students, from left, John MayBee, James Faucher, Cassie Jones and Nancy Fujikado stand in front of the Curiosity Mars rover on display at Arizona State University in Tempe. The students toured the university’s engineering transfer program. They all attend MCC’s Kingman campus.

KINGMAN - The largest group to date of Mohave Community College students and regional high school students recently completed a tour in Tempe of Arizona State University's engineering program, which is designed specifically for college transfer students.

"It's fantastic that ASU has put this service together for students, especially like me, from a small town moving up to a big city," said James Faucher, a 34-year-old MCC engineering student on the Neal Campus-Kingman. "They give you plenty of resources and their level of excitement, their passion for helping students, is impressive."

Four MCC engineering students, six computer science students from MCC's Bullhead City campus and 18 Kingman High School students toured ASU's Motivated Engineering Transfer Student program.

MCC started an engineering program in the spring of 2012 to offer students an associate in applied science toward their completion of the first two years of a bachelor's degree. The METS program provides support services including workshops, mentorship and a study center for engineering and computer science students transferring from community colleges, according to the program's website.

Faucher said he would have had a more difficult time discovering which career best suited him if MCC had not started its engineering program. Faucher began the program in the summer of 2012 and plans to transfer to ASU in Tempe this fall.

"I want to work on hearing aids," he said. "So without this program, I would have been a lot more lost about where I need to go and what kind of degree I should receive. It's been great. The ASU representatives have done an excellent job of outlining their expectations and how to meet those expectations."

Also for the first time, the ASU METS program, in partnership with the National Science Foundation, awarded a total of $6,000 in scholarships to eight MCC students on the Kingman and Bullhead City campuses for the Spring 2013 semester.

The Bullhead City recipients were Craig Collins, Jordan Miller and David Reyes. The Neal Campus-Kingman recipients were Tyler Cole, James Faucher, Cassandra Jones, Jacob Lawson and John MayBee.

MCC students interested in the ASU METS program are encouraged to speak with their advisor about scholarship opportunities.

For more information about MCC's engineering or computer science programs, call (866) 664-2832 between 7 a.m. to 11 p.m., seven days a week.