Kingman Presbyterian celebrates its roots in the 1960s

KINGMAN - Love beads, Beatles wigs, peace signs and colorful tie-dyed clothing will be the rage at Kingman Presbyterian Church's "Celebration of the Sixties Revisited" get-together next week.

The free public event, which also celebrates the founding of the church in 1963, will feature a classic car and motorcycle show, live bands, food and a portrayal of Jonathan Edwards, a Christian preacher and theologian in the 1700s, by the Rev. Grif Vautier, a retired KPC pastor. Visitors are invited to dress in '60s clothing, and a prize will be awarded to the most unusual costume.

"It's going to be a real fun time celebrating both the '60s and the 50th anniversary of our church," said Vautier. "Many things in society changed during the '60s, but not all of those changes were bad. There was the peace movement, a new respect for individual opinion, and the start of the Jesus and Vineyard movements. And many in the hippie movement got disillusioned and plugged into churches to later became productive members."

The car and motorcycle show, music, food and dress-up will take place from 1-5 p.m. Oct. 26 in the parking lot of the church, located at 2425 Detroit Ave. The music includes Bob Carlson and his band, the church's Praise Team performing '60s songs and Howard Melendez playing Elvis and Roy Orbison music. The next day, Vautier will portray Edwards at 10:30 a.m. during the morning service.

The "Celebration of the Sixties Revisited" is the second phase of the church's year-long anniversary party. It began in June with an open house and golden anniversary worship service. The church was founded June 16, 1963, when it was officially organized at a worship service. Activities took place at the American Legion Hall until a chapel and multi-purpose wing were erected at the present location in 1965. A new sanctuary and nursery facility were added in 1999.

Pat Krivenko, the golden anniversary chairman, said she is looking forward to the celebration events, especially viewing the clothes and hairstyles representing the turbulent time. Krivenko said the car and motorcycle show will feature a variety of classics, including a 1915 Cadillac and vehicles from the 1940s.

"The '60s was a fun era in many ways, and we just want to have fun with this celebration," said Krivenko. "It's something different, and we want to invite the community to come and enjoy it with us."