Christmas Coloring Contest
The Kingman Daily Miner Logo
Trusted local news leader for Kingman, Arizona & Mohave County
1:37 AM Wed, Dec. 12th

Kingman native runs for Boston

Doctor treated victims after bombings last year during famed marathon

Courtesy<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->Dr. Tiffany Blake-Lamb will run the Boston Marathon one year after the former Kingman and Bullhead City resident provided emergency care to victim’s of last year’s bombings.

Courtesy<br /><br /><!-- 1upcrlf2 -->Dr. Tiffany Blake-Lamb will run the Boston Marathon one year after the former Kingman and Bullhead City resident provided emergency care to victim’s of last year’s bombings.

KINGMAN - What would motivate someone who has never run long distances to train and train and train for the Boston Marathon?

When the runner is a doctor who triaged victims of last year's Boston Marathon bombings at a hospital just a few miles away, the answer becomes obvious.

Dr. Tiffany Blake-Lamb, born in Kingman and raised in Kingman and Bullhead City, will be one of about 36,000 runners who will participate in the 118th Boston Marathon April 21 - one year and six days after terrorists detonated two pressure cooker bombs near the finish line on Boylston Street, killing three and wounding about 260 others.

Blake-Lamb, 34, an instructor of obstetrics and gynecology at Boston's Massachusetts General Hospital, spent a summer during college at her grandmother Carol Scholer's home in Kingman and worked as a lifeguard at the city pool.

She's been guarding lives ever since.

The carnage that followed the explosions was significant and the injuries extreme. Blake-Lamb was affected by those she helped that day.

"She will run for them," said her uncle, Chuck Scholer, of Kingman.

Brandi Murphy said her sister was working the morning of the bombings.

"Injured victims were brought to this nearby hospital and she helped respond with emergency care," said Murphy. "The bombing was just miles from her hospital and her home at the time, so she was very sympathetic to the plight of those injured.

"She really loves the city of Boston and had always hoped to run the Boston Marathon, but this incident was just the motivation she needed to make it happen in 2014."

Blake-Lamb will also run to raise funds for Healthworks Community Fitness, a nonprofit organization that provides a wide range of health-related services to women in low-income neighborhoods.

All runners must pledge at least $10,000 to participate in the marathon and Murphy said Blake-Lamb is about halfway to her goal.

Blake-Lamb earned her medical degree from the University of Arizona College of Medicine and her master's degree in science from the Harvard School of Public Health, said Murphy.

Carol Scholer, who moved to Kingman in 1962, said her granddaughters have always been the type to give back.

Blake-Lamb is also the granddaughter of the late Nellie Blake, a longtime and well-known Kingman resident.

Murphy said both grandmothers were "extremely supportive" in Blake-Lamb's dreams to become a doctor.

"Tiffany often reflects that their example of love and kindness to others has deeply influenced her," said Murphy.

"I've always been very proud of them," said Carol Scholer.

Her son, Chuck, agrees his niece is a special human being.

"She's continuing her lifelong dedication to helping people," he said. "She started helping people the day she was born."

Murphy said her sister is a "shining example of someone who has a passion for helping people and a strong commitment to academic pursuits."

Blake-Lamb focuses a significant portion of her medical practice on the "underprivileged and overlooked," said Murphy, a character trait she learned as a child.

"Her roots in Mohave County ground her with a deep respect for people from all walks of life and her education is empowering her to provide medical help to those in need," said Murphy.

For those who intend to watch the race on television, Blake-Lamb will wear No. 30569.