Let's Talk About Pain Treatment

Many physicians are afraid to treat pain today. Now pharmacies are putting quotas on pain medications, leaving legitimate patients to live, or die and in pain.

Our current drug policies have failed and made us a nation of suspects. If you're not a cop, you're a suspect, and even cops don't trust other cops.

The few physicians who are willing to treat pain see each new patient as potential criminal, one who could cause the loss of their medical license and their freedom.

The doctor-patient, and pharmacist-patient relationship, both depend on trust. Sadly, today it's common for pharmacists to lie to patients. If a pharmacist is willing to lie about one thing, how can you trust anything they say?

According to the National Institute of Medicine, "Chronic pain affects about 100 million American adults - more than the total affected by heart disease, cancer, and diabetes combined. Pain also costs the nation up to $635 billion each year in medical treatment and lost productivity."

See more at: http://www.iom.edu/Reports/2011/Relieving-Pain-in-America-A-Blueprint-for-Transforming-Prevention-Care-Education-Research/Report-Brief.aspx

My name is Jay Fleming, and I have a unique view of our nation's drug policy.

I understand chronic pain. I had back surgery in 1988 that left me with nerve damage, and neuropathic pain in my legs and feet. Its like when your foot falls asleep, you get that pins and needles feeling, and it hurts to walk on it. Except in my case, it never goes away. It caused neurogenic muscle atrophy in my right calf, where I've lost much of the muscle.

I understand young cops always want to save the world from drugs, but it doesn't take long to figure out that doesn't work. If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

I understand older cops know our drug policy is a failure, but can't risk their pension by speaking out against something they know has failed.

Talk to you soon ...

Jay