Letter: The Venice of Arizona

Venice, Italy, is a city built upon the waterfront, where "streets" consist mostly of canals with boat access. Venice, Calif., is an oceanfront city where, in the last century, canals were dug to emulate the real Venice in Italy. But over the decades, the California canals were filled in and the old world charm was lost.

Believe it or not, parts of Kingman are moving in the direction of old Venice. After decades of "grading" Kingman's unpaved roads to repair flood damage that creates gullies, deposits rocks and the like, some of the unpaved dirt roads have sunk to a level of 18 inches below what they once were.

It is only a matter of time until these roads become so deep that they will become canals requiring boat access to the adjacent homes during the monsoon season. Perhaps the city fathers will decree that they should just be left flooded year-round, with the novel mode of flat-bottom boat access being deemed more practical, and certainly more picturesque than regular dirt roads that Public Works seems to be so fond of.

The curious thing that prompts this letter is the recent repaving on Stockton Hill Road between Detroit Avenue and the Interstate. Does anyone remember there being any potholes here in need of repair? Any major cracks, or layers of detached asphalt creating a risk of flying roadway chunks putting windshields and pedestrians at risk? I certainly don't recall any such liability.

City fathers: "Hey, it's not OUR money!"

I wonder how the residents of Kingman's future canals feel about this repaving as they navigate their way home, slipping and sliding in the pre-canal mud-zones which, short of helicopter pads, are their only routes home.

Wouldn't it be interesting if the mayor and all City Council members and Public Works employees and managers, were mandated by irrevocable city ordinance (with a fixed time deadline), to take up residence in one of Kingman's future canal zones?

I would love to see this happen. It would be far more entertaining than the development of Kingman's future canals.

Norman Swartz

Kingman