Downtown pioneer moving to new, larger location

Chelsea Curry, daughter of Beale Street Brews owner Angela Patterson, works the counter on the last day of business for the coffee shop in the Central Commercial Building. Beale Street Brews is relocating to 510 E. Beale St. (HUBBLE RAY SMITH/Miner)

Chelsea Curry, daughter of Beale Street Brews owner Angela Patterson, works the counter on the last day of business for the coffee shop in the Central Commercial Building. Beale Street Brews is relocating to 510 E. Beale St. (HUBBLE RAY SMITH/Miner)

KINGMAN - Beale Street Brews, a pioneer in the rejuvenation of downtown's historic business district, is leaving the Central Commercial Building and will relocate to 510 E. Beale Street, owner Angela Patterson said Friday.

She was hoping to have the coffee shop open soon after her monthly lease expired on Nov. 30 but has run into complications with the city of Kingman regarding architectural plans and building requirements.

Patterson, who opened Beale Street Brews in 2007, said her business had outgrown its space and the building was old. It would cost too much to upgrade the building's electrical system to power new brewing equipment, she said.

"I gave her [property owner Carol Ott] a letter of intent and she gave me a move-out date," Patterson said. "It motivated everybody to move fast except the city. They're a slug."

Patterson said she had to hire an architect to submit drawings on a building that's been there since the 1960s, and it's now going to cost about $15,000 to renovate the former bank building on the corner of Fifth and Beale streets.

She plans to open sometime this month.

Beale Street Brews grew into a cultural hangout for downtown hipsters, including coffee connoisseurs, artists, poets and writers.

Patterson started First Friday, a celebration of art, music and poetry on the first Friday of each month, and enthusiastically embraced KABAM (Kingman Area Books Are Magic), part of a nationwide literacy program.

The new location has a spacious parking lot that will allow Patterson to expand special events.

"I plan on having a lot of fun with the space, block parties and things, and I plan on having a drive-through window," she said.

In addition to coffee, Beale Street Brews sells smoothies, Italian sodas, tea, alcohol, bagel sandwiches and homemade pastries.

Patterson had always envisioned a coffee shop in historic downtown Kingman, a place with a cozy atmosphere for people to relax, enjoy her specialty brews and support the arts.

Toys for Tots

The Kingman Golden Valley Association of Realtors has raised more than $1,000 for the Toys for Tots program this year, with a goal of topping last year's donations of more than $6,500, Association Executive Robin Day said.

The Toys for Tots drive, initiated by the U.S. Marine Corps, runs through Dec. 15 with a number of fundraising events organized by the Realtors association. Real estate agents raised $910 in their bingo game and Bob Bass Realty added another $100.

Yesterday's Restaurant at 9827 N. Second St. in Chloride is donating 10 percent of all receipts and tips from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dec. 12 to the toy drive. Final donations will come from a 50-50 drawing on Dec. 16.

Antique store closing

Remember When Antique Mall & More is closing in January and owners John and Liz Carpenter are moving back to Indiana to be closer to their grandchildren, Liz Carpenter told the Daily Miner.

She said landlord Terry Thomson plans to give the building at 314-318 E. Beale St. a more modern look with stonework similar to what was done on the adjacent House of Hops. He wants to put in a brewery and pizza place.

Rent for the retail space and two-bedroom apartment in the rear of the store is going to double from $1,650 to $3,300 a month, Carpenter said.

Most of the vendors who sublet space at Remember When are looking to move into other antique stores on Beale Street.

Certified body shop

T&R Upholstery Bodyworks at 3200 Shangri La Drive has been officially certified by Assured Performance, a nonprofit consumer advocacy organization specializing in automotive collision repair.

To become certified, T&R Upholstery passed a rigorous process to ensure the right tools, equipment, training and facility are used to repair vehicles to manufacturer specifications.

Rodrigo Torres, owner of T&R Upholstery, said new car models use lightweight, high-strength materials and advanced technology. It's more important than ever to make sure repairs meet vehicle specifications for passenger safety and proper performance, he said.

Less than 5 percent of body shops across the nation are certified by Assured Performance. T&R is also certified by Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, GM, Ford and Hyundai.