City to post Kingman Crossing fact sheet to website ahead of election

Move will save $12,000 in printing costs

One of the under-reported but still important aspects of the Kingman Crossing project is how Kingman Regional Medical Center hopes to expand its Hualapai campus once - and if - the Kingman Crossing interchange is built.

Photo by JC Amberlyn.

One of the under-reported but still important aspects of the Kingman Crossing project is how Kingman Regional Medical Center hopes to expand its Hualapai campus once - and if - the Kingman Crossing interchange is built.

Note: The vote was not unanimous. Councilman Larry Carver voted against not publishing the pamphlet.

KINGMAN – During its meeting Tuesday, the City Council unanimously voted to not publish a publicity pamphlet regarding the contentious Kingman Crossing land sale issue, saving taxpayers $12,000.

The Council originally thought the printing of the informational pamphlet was required regarding the 168 acres of city-owned land adjacent to the southern side of Interstate 40 that is headed to voters on the Nov. 8 general election ballot.

Instead, it was discovered that the information for voters could be placed on the city’s website, hence the savings in printing costs.

The Kingman Crossing plan is one of the biggest issues the community has voted on in years. It essentially would open up the access-starved eastern part of the city, between the Andy Devine interchange and Rattlesnake Wash.

“I view it (Kingman Crossing) as vital and important,” said City Manager John Dougherty. He says it would open up another area for the community that could bolster the tax base.

Looking further into the future, Daugherty said another interchange, at the Rattlesnake Wash, will be needed. “Eventually it will happen,” Daugherty said.

Along with commercial development, which the city leans heavily on for taxes to pay for services since property taxes were abolished in 1980, the plan calls for a $25 million interchange, which would finally open up access to the Kingman Regional Medical Center’s Hualapai Campus on the north side of I-40. The medical center is eyeing expansion.

The interchange is seen as key to the Kingman Crossing plan, and without it, growth on both sides of the interstate will not come to fruition. Who is going to pay for it is one of the huge unknowns. A likely scenario is a consortium of developers would be needed.

Of the 168 acres, 151 would be zoned commercial and the remaining 17 acres would be zoned for parks and open space, mostly due to the need for drainage.

If voters give the thumbs down to Kingman Crossing in November, the Council could circumvent their will and be within state requirements by subdividing the land into parcels valued at $1.5 million and under.

Kingman Crossing is most likely a few years away from breaking ground and a new Council will be seated, further clouding the plan.