Pets, like people, need protection from Arizona’s summer heat

Gracie, the photographer’s Havanese dog, sits inside a vehicle on a hot summer day (but only momentarily and with the air conditioner going).

Photo by JC Amberlyn.

Gracie, the photographer’s Havanese dog, sits inside a vehicle on a hot summer day (but only momentarily and with the air conditioner going).

photo

Jenny, a mixed breed dog at Mutt Matchers, stands on the sidewalk Saturday. Be mindful of how hot pavement is when walking your dog.

How hot is too hot?

“If it’s too hot for your bare feet, it’s too hot for theirs,” said Judy Torgerson of Mutt Matchers.

KINGMAN – People at Mutt Matchers and Friends want to remind pet owners to be mindful about their dogs (as well as other animals and children) in the summer heat.

Temperatures are still toasty in August and if owners don’t take appropriate precautions, their beloved pets can face discomfort, injury or even death.

Hot paws

Many people are aware of the dangers of leaving a dog in a car on a hot day, but not everyone thinks about hot pavement. Yes, take a moment and consider how hot a sidewalk or pavement gets on a summer day, then imagine a dog’s feet on it. Owners may think they’re giving their pets a nice walk but in extreme heat the pavement can burn a dog’s paws.

“If it’s too hot for your bare feet, it’s too hot for theirs,” said Judy Torgerson of Mutt Matchers. She encourages owners to place their bare feet or just the palm of their hand on the sidewalk on a hot day to get a feel for the temperature. If it burns your hand, it will burn their paws too. When possible, walk pets on grass or wait for morning or evening walks. There are also boots one can buy to place on dog’s feet to protect them.