Council moves to boost business in city

The Kingman City Council recognized 12 city employees for their service during Tuesday’s council meeting. Pictured, from left, are Gary Higgins, Joanne Longo and Sherri Furr. All three are employed in the Public Works department and have put in 10 years each.

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The Kingman City Council recognized 12 city employees for their service during Tuesday’s council meeting. Pictured, from left, are Gary Higgins, Joanne Longo and Sherri Furr. All three are employed in the Public Works department and have put in 10 years each.

KINGMAN – The City Council voted Tuesday during its meeting to proceed with two plans that could potentially boost business here.

The first move was to initiate a zoning ordinance amendment and a zoning map amendment as part of creating a Downtown Development District. The council voted 6-1 to go forward with it.

The big changes that the Planning and Zoning Commission will analyze at its Nov. 6 meeting are lessening the minimum lot size and not requiring off street parking.

“I’m excited to see downtown move forward,” said Councilman Stuart Yocum, who said that he was an “advocate” and “proponent” of boosting the downtown, which has been “overdue.”

But not every on the councilmember was for the development of the DDD.

“I look at it as another layer of bureaucracy … ” said Councilman Larry Carver, the lone dissenter, who said the DDD “will not promote growth, it will stunt growth.”

Travis Ligenfelter, who is poised to take a seat on the council after being elected in the last election, addressed the council and asked that residents be involved in the process in the form a public hearing.

City Development Services Director Gary Jeppson told the board he could advertise a public meeting about the DDD plan, and the council gave him the direction to do so.

The other action the council took that could potentially boost business was to OK a contract with Buxton of Fort Worth, Texas, to generate a retail development strategy.

On Sept. 14, the Economic Development and Marketing Commission heard presentations from four firms that wanted to perform the service. After deliberations, the EDMC recommended Buxton for the $60,000 contract.

Another major item at the meeting dealt with the Kingman Airport Authority contract with the city.

City attorney Carl Cooper was directed to find prospective attorneys who were capable. He presented three prospects to the council, and the council tossed around their thoughts after reading their bios.

That’s when Ligenfelter approached the council and asked why it hadn’t sought the free advice of the Arizona attorney general. Ligenfelter said he learned that one of the prospective attorneys charges $450 an hour.

Ligenfelter also asked the council when it would release details of the contract to the public.

Cooper said, “It’s not as easy as it seems.” He said the attorney general usually works on issues pertaining the state of Arizona. But he said it couldn’t hurt to ask.

Council instructed Cooper to do so on a 6-1 vote. Carver was the lone dissenter.

On a sewer issue, city staff proposed five alternatives for money that would be saved by refinancing the loan for the Hilltop Wastewater Treatment Plant. The proposed plan was to lower prices for residential customers.

Councilman Mark Abram inquired about allowing the city’s commercial businesses sharing in the savings.

City staff will bring back to the council another alternative.