Chinese city and Hualapai Tribe declare "sister canyons"

A tourist takes full advantage of the incredible view the Skywalk provides at Grand Canyon West. A Chinese delegation from Enshi – home to China’s version of a grand canyon – agreed to join forces as “Sister Canyons” with the Hualapai Tribe.

Photo by JC Amberlyn.

A tourist takes full advantage of the incredible view the Skywalk provides at Grand Canyon West. A Chinese delegation from Enshi – home to China’s version of a grand canyon – agreed to join forces as “Sister Canyons” with the Hualapai Tribe.

PEACH SPRINGS – A 15-member delegation from the city of Enshi in the Hubei province of the People’s Republic of China are visiting Grand Canyon West this weekend.

Enshi has its own version of the Grand Canyon that is fast becoming a global tourist attraction. The Enshi Grand Canyon is a little over 60 miles long, about 4,500 feet deep with a width of less than two miles.

Enshi and Grand Canyon West have agreed to a “sister canyon” relationship to promote international tourism and cultural exchanges.

The Mayor of Enshi, various Chinese municipal officials and directors of the Enshi Grand Canyon tourism development corporation traveled to Grand Canyon West from Las Vegas on Saturday afternoon.

The Chinese delegation was scheduled to meet with members of the Hualapai Tribe and other representatives from Grand Canyon West.

The two parties will discuss their mutual interest before signing a memorandum of cooperation.

While at Grand Canyon West, the Chinese delegation experienced the Grand Canyon Skywalk and Guano Point.

They spent Saturday night at Hualapai Ranch and will return to Las Vegas later today.