Letter: Police shootings are a big city problem

It seems that nearly every morning I watch another police involved shooting on the news. Instead of getting better, it seems to be getting worse! What has changed, that has made these tragedies an everyday occurrence?

It appears to this reader that drawing a weapon and using it has just become common practice. No stun guns or rubber bullets. One false move and your dead! This includes the officer, as well. Heaven forbid you should move your hand to scratch your nose!

Over the years I have seen many changes within most police departments. It is not unusual to see six to 10 officers on the scene of a misdemeanor stop. Guns drawn immediately, and several officers screaming out orders. With all that chaos going on is it any wonder that people are getting shot and killed?

I understand that traffic stops can be the most deadly for police, but a simple traffic infraction should never result in the driver being shot.

Last time I checked, nothing in the driving laws is considered a capital offense!

Just imagine for a moment if you were hearing impaired, or did not understand our language as well as some.

The likelihood of you becoming a shooting victim are very high.

If you are mentally ill, the odds for you getting shot and killed are even higher. How is it that private citizens are as likely to become shooting victims by police as are those who have committed a crime?

How easy has it become to get rid of a boyfriend or a troublesome neighbor? A simple call to 911 can take care of things.

When they ask you if whomever you feel threatened by is “armed” you only need to say “I think he may have a gun.” When police respond to your call they are ready to shoot somebody.

Personally, I think most of these current problems begin at the police training academy. I do not believe they are teaching anything about protecting and serving the community anymore. I think it is about protecting themselves!

It has become far too easy for police to justify each and every police involved shooting. From turning off dash cams to lying or planting a weapon. The “I thought my life was in imminent danger” is getting old.

The escalating number of trigger happy cops has certainly spoiled things for those who truly are out there to get the bad guys, and protect the good.

I think the Kingman police do an exceptional job at protecting the good guys. Fortunately, most of the problems seem to be with larger departments.

But then again, the odds increase with the number of police who are out there.

Linda Varon

Kingman