Letter: If they’re going to get fixed, tax increases are necessary

If there was ever a time to tell your congressman or woman what you want them to do, this would be a good time to do it because they can’t agree on how to pay for many things, including fixing the Affordable Care Act.

They have proposed turning much of the ACA and Medicaid over to the states and not giving the enough money to pay for it. The states will have to raise property and sales taxes because they do not have the money either.

Starting a national sales tax of 7 percent placed on personal consumption items amounting to approximately $8 trillion will produce approximately $560 billion a year.

This will be enough money to take care of the ACA, VA healthcare, Medicaid, Medicare and Social Security, which also need money.

Our infrastructure of roads, bridges, water ports, water pipes, railways and airports are all in need of repair and modernization. It’s going to take many, many years to complete and cost trillions of dollars.

A 50-cent per gallon gas tax increase and sales and license plate renewal fees on electric vehicles will provide about $70 billion per year. Along with the $36 billion already collected, more than $100 billion will be available for infrastructure projects, which will create millions of business and employment opportunities.

With the other ideas, congress has to save money, and by reforming the income tax code they can help make our businesses more competitive in the world and start to create more business and employment opportunities for everyone.

Then we can start to balance the budget and pay down the debt like paying off a 30- or 40-year home mortgage.

To get all of this to happen, you are going to have to call your congressman and tell him you would support his efforts to make it come true.

The younger people deserve this, and not further reductions, which have already started in reduction of cost of living adjustments to Social Security as we have seen the last few years.

These taxes can be implemented over three years, so they don’t adversely affect anyone.

James R. Emmons