‘Art in Public Places’ program taking applications for new artwork

The 12-foot metal sculpture “Running Hare” was created in 2015 by Don Gialenella, resident artist at the ArtHub, and was donated to Route 66 Association for public display on Route 66 at Fourth Street.

Miner/file

The 12-foot metal sculpture “Running Hare” was created in 2015 by Don Gialenella, resident artist at the ArtHub, and was donated to Route 66 Association for public display on Route 66 at Fourth Street.

KINGMAN – You don’t have to visit an art gallery or museum to see beautiful artwork.

“Running Hare,” a 12-foot metal sculpture by former ArtHub resident Donald Gialanella, stands at the corner of Route 66 and Fourth street. It’s a great example of public artwork that the City of Kingman is working to promote.

“Art in Public Places” is a new effort to beautify and create interesting works of art in public spaces, said Josh Noble, director of tourism for the city.

The pilot program is a collaboration between the mayor, city manager and volunteers from the Kingman Center for the arts.

The program has a $10,000 budget to fund artwork that will distinguish Kingman as a special place to live, work, play and visit, Noble said.

It will provide a means to counterbalance what may be considered “negative” outcomes of development such as construction noise, traffic, congestion and pollution, he said. The goal is to provide every member of the community easy visual access to art.

Proposed art projects are currently being sought by the review committee. Projects will be awarded based on artistic expression, scale and content, and permanence and materials.

Local artists receive preference points, but the program is open to anyone wishing to participate.

All awarded art will be installed on city property and will be owned and maintained by the city.

“Kingman has an eclectic mix of murals, neon signs and historic structures,” Noble said. “But it became all too obvious just how much public art Kingman lacked when we looked around for existing samples. There isn’t much and we hope to change that.”

The committee’s goal is to further expand “Art in Public Places” and provide more visually interesting pieces that represent Kingman, instill pride in the community, and add value to public spaces.

To find apply for the program, contact Noble at 928-753-6106 or email him at jnoble@cityofkingman.gov. Applications can be downloaded at www.cityofkingman.gov.