Route 66 Walk of Fame bricks part of making Kingman a stopping place

A Walk of Fame brick along Andy Devine Avenue in downtown Kingman near Hotel Brunswick.

Photo by JC Amberlyn.

A Walk of Fame brick along Andy Devine Avenue in downtown Kingman near Hotel Brunswick.

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Walk of Fame bricks along Andy Devine Avenue.

KINGMAN – The Route 66 Walk of Fame is one of several ideas tourism director Josh Noble has for marketing Kingman as a place to stop and look around and get a feel for all the town has to offer.

The city has made $6,000 off the bricks, which cost between $100 and $250, depending on their size, and are placed on downtown sidewalks to create the Route 66 Walk of Fame.

Noble said 15 honorary bricks have been put out on the street, along with 34 paid bricks.

He doesn’t know exactly how many bricks have been ordered, but those that are paid for have all been produced. Now it’s just a matter of where to place them.

One possibility is to use them to enhance the entrance to the Powerhouse Visitor Center and Route 66 Museum.

“The bricks on (Route) 66 still have a lot of unknowns,” Noble said. “Right now, we’re waiting on the completion of a survey of the grounds around the Powerhouse to see what options we have.

“There’s egress and ingress concerns, utility line concerns, easements, the railroad … so there’s a lot of factors to consider before developing a master plan,” he said.

The Route 66 Walk of Fame was dedicated outside Mr. D’z Diner at the International Route 66 Festival in Kingman in 2014 to honor people who contributed to making Route 66 America’s most iconic highway.

Dora Manley, who organized the festival, explained that once a brick is purchased, the city takes one of the red bricks that have been along the curb on Route 66 between First and Sixth streets and replaces it with an engraved “Walk of Fame” brick.

Anyone can purchase a brick and have it engraved with whatever name they want, along with the date it was dedicated.

Money from the purchase of bricks goes into the city’s beautification fund.

Anyone who wants to obtain a brick can go to the Powerhouse visitor center to order it.

The inaugural Route 66 Walk of Fame nominees were Andy Devine, Kingman native and noted Western film actor; Michael Wallis, speaker and author of several books on Route 66; Angel Delgadillo, Seligman barbershop owner and Route 66 promoter; Bob Boze Bell, illustrator and author of “The Route 66 Kid;” David and Mary Lou Knudson, credited with forming National Historic Route 66 Federation; John and Lenore Weiss, founders of Illinois Route 66 Association; Dr. John Lingenfelter, prominent family physician and philanthropist in Kingman; and Bob Waldmire, well-known Route 66 artist.

The 2015 inductees were:

Zdnek and Eva Jurasek: They founded the Czech Route 66 and frequently lead tours of Route 66. Zdnek produced two documentaries on the highway and was involved in the first European Route 66 Festival in Germany last summer.

Dries and Marion Bessels: They were instrumental in founding the Dutch Route 66 Association and assisted with the Netherlands-based U.S. Bikers Route 66 tours. They were honorary grand marshals in the 2016 Andy Devine Days parade.

Dale and Kristi-Anne Butel: They own Route 66 Tours in Brisbane, Australia, and are strong supporters of towns along Route 66.

Jerry McClanahan: He’s an acclaimed Route 66 artist, researcher of old Route 66 alignments and author of “EZ 66 Guide for Travelers.”