Why in our backyard?

As I read from time to time about the high level of blowdown noise coming from the Hackberry natural gas pumping station, there is always this missing data. Which came first, the pumping station, or the nearby residents?

This is like people building near an airport, and then, years or decades later, complaining to the powers-that-be about it. The only difference really, is that it is far easier to relocate a pumping station than to relocate an airport!

After all, with a thousand-mile long pipeline, is there any compelling reason why the pumping station is at the present location, as opposed to say, 20 miles out in the desert? Come on people, talk some sense here!

If there is a natural gas well or some other undisclosed peculiarity about the present location that more-or-less dictates that the pumping station be located exactly HERE, then let’s hear what it is! Why aren’t people talking about it?

But if there is no such absolute location requirement, then why aren’t company officials and residents alike, talking about relocation costs, instead of “Shut up!” costs?

So you will have to run power lines out into the desert along the pipeline somewhere. And build a house or two next to the boondocks pumping-station for the requisite maintenance crew.

Isn’t this better than bickering over noise levels that will always be too loud, and million-dollar plus “muffling” costs that will always be too expensive?

The only solution that would make everyone happy is the one being scrupulously ignored.

Judges asked to rule in airport noise cases ought to slap class-action resident litigants with the legal costs of defending the present airport locations, and send them home with the admonition to “grow up” while preparing to move, or build double walls and roofs, or dig cellars for soundproofing.

And speaking of going underground for soundproofing… Why doesn’t the company buy enough adjacent land to build an earth pyramid/mountain to bury the noise? Turn the window-rattling blowdowns into a minor seismic event!

The present approach is nuts. What is this, being politically correct by ignoring the obvious?

Norman Swartz,

Retired Engineer,

Kingman