Letter: Turning over a new leaf is hard to do in Kingman

Being young in Kingman doesn’t give a person much of a chance in life.

Having nothing to entertain the kids, especially kids that have no money, like many of the children in the Butler and Birdland areas of town, it leaves it wide open for them to find their own entertainment.

And I, being a Kingmanite, know well it rarely turns out well.

Once Kingman, Arizona officers of the law, namely the sheriff’s deputies, get your number you can kiss your future goodbye. Regardless of how hard you might try to keep on the right side of the law, if they have seen your face you are screwed.

I am not sure of the purpose for my letter today. All I know is that I have been in trouble and a lot of it. Now that I’m a little bit older and a lot less bold, and with a son of my own, getting back onto the right side of the law is near impossible.

There are many programs that assist felons in returning to society in Phoenix. As for Mohave County? Not so much.

I know in this county it’s hard to stay on the right side of the law when they look down on you for past mistakes.

The truth of the matter is this: Before I had no reason to stay out of trouble because it didn’t matter, but now that I do have a reason it’s hard to raise him without a job due to my past.

Of course, the lesson in all this is don’t get in trouble – period. But that horse is already out so the closing of the barn door would do no good.

What I am left with is having to make a choice. Do I stay in Kingman where there is no future due to a lack of opportunity – or move to Phoenix where there is lots of crime and danger?

Can’t we just be a community with open minds and believe that people can change?

Jana Gallagher

Kingman