Kingman Crossing, circuses at Tuesday’s meeting

Monica Gates and Travis Lingenfelter

Courtesy

Monica Gates and Travis Lingenfelter

KINGMAN – Debate will continue on what direction the city should take regarding the Kingman Crossing project, and the treatment of circus animals has found its way on to the Kingman Common Council’s agenda for this week’s meeting at 5:30 p.m. Tuesday in the Mohave County Administration Building, 700 W. Beale St.

Mayor Monica Gates and Councilman Travis Lingenfelter each have placed agenda items regarding Kingman Crossing. Gates wants a resolution passed, much like she did at the previous council meeting July 5, to move the project forward. Lingenfelter has requested a presentation on an “alternative financing and design/build project delivery method,” according to the agenda.

Gates tried to move forward with a professional services contract worth nearly $1.2 million for the design of the project at the last meeting. That failed to pass when Lingenfelter brought up his alternative-method idea, which did pass on a 4-3 vote with Lingenfelter getting votes from Vice-Mayor Jen Miles, Councilwoman Jamie Scott Stehly and Councilman David Wayt.

The mayor wants to move forward now that Kingman Regional Medical Center has come into view as a major player. KRMC wants to purchase the land voters approved in November for the city to sell and fund a traffic interchange itself north of Airway Avenue at Interstate 40 . KRMC is requesting that a “sales tax sharing agreement” be reached with the city to offset some of its “significant investment,” according to a letter written by KRMC CEO Brian Turney to the city.

Along with the presentation, Lingenfelter is also asking for council action to move city staff toward issuing “a competitive Request For Qualifications in partnership with KRMC as Step-One of the Two-Step competitive public procurement process to select a top-rated multidisciplinary development team” for the project.

Mayor Gates received information from Animal Defenders International, an organization that wants to restrict the use of exotic and non-domesticated animals in circuses. ADI has worked with many other towns and cities on legislation to thwart the use of these animals in the name of animal, worker and public safety.

City Council is also scheduled to receive a presentation regarding the city’s space needs analysis. There are four options available to the city: 1) Keep things as is with the many different departments scattered around Kingman. 2) Build an addition to the current City Complex on Fourth Street, which would allow for all departments in one location with the exception of the Kingman Police Department. 3) Do a new-build that would allow for all departments at one location and allow for vertical growth if needed down the road. 4) Acquire and rehabilitate Palo Christ Elementary School at 500 Maple St. Kingman Boys and Girls Club CEO Bill Ward has stated his organization is also interested in the closed school.

Council is expected the approve the consent agenda, which includes the purchase of two Chevrolet Tahoes at nearly $35,000 each from Courtesy Chevrolet of Phoenix for the Kingman Fire Department and Communications 911 Center. An agreement to make a financial contribution contract to the Kathryn Heidenreich Center over the next two years is expected to be approved as well.

A representative from the Kingman Airport Authority is expected make its quarterly report to the council.