Dear Abby: Mixed messages from mom have teen looking for clarity

Dear Abby: I’m 17. My mom and I often disagree on things. Don’t get me wrong – I don’t care what she does in her free time, but lately I have learned she’s talking to people about bisexuality. I don’t know how to handle this or how to talk to her about it.

I feel betrayed. When I told her I was gay, she rejected my sexuality, and now she’s possibly wanting relationships with other females? Even now, when we watch the news and something about the LGBT community comes on, she still mutters about marriage being between one man and one woman.

I don’t want things to escalate into a big blowup over this because our relationship is just being repaired. Please help me. Am I wrong to be concerned, or do I have the right to be? – Teen in Dayton, Ohio

Dear Teen: I don’t think it would escalate into an argument if you were to tell your mother you are confused by the mixed messages you’re getting from her. It seems odd to me, too, that she would reject your sexual orientation if she’s leaning in both directions herself.

As to her feelings about marriage equality, you might be interested to know that not everyone thinks the idea of marriage (LGBT or otherwise) is appealing. If your mother is interested in open relationships, she may be part of that group.

Dear Abby: I went on a road trip with a friend who is normally kind and generous. She insisted on driving the entire way. She often exceeded the speed limit and kept less than 20 feet between us and the 18-wheel truck ahead.

She read texts, answered her cellphone and made phone calls while she was driving. She’s very demonstrative when she talks, so while she drove, holding her cell with her left hand, she’d take her other hand off the wheel to gesture. More than once she nearly hit a guardrail.

I was so frightened I broke into sobs. She responded by laughing at me! Can you give me a tactful way to tell her how dangerous her driving really is? – Terrified in Memphis

Dear Terrified: No, because it’s obvious that your friend is in deep denial not only about how dangerous her driving is, but also about how it affects her passengers and other drivers around her. But I can suggest that from now on, you provide the transportation if you’re going anyplace together.