Two friends, two fish, 76 pounds

Tim Flatt of Meadview shows off the 28-pound, 12-ounce striped bass he caught on the first day of spring at Lake Mead. His friend landed a 48-pounder the next day.

Courtesy

Tim Flatt of Meadview shows off the 28-pound, 12-ounce striped bass he caught on the first day of spring at Lake Mead. His friend landed a 48-pounder the next day.

KINGMAN – Tim Flatt and Jack Ginkins have known each other since high school, so it’s with no regret that Flatt turned his rod and reel over to his longtime fishing buddy when a 48-pound, 13-ounce striped bass hit the line in Lake Mead Tuesday.

Flatt had just hooked a 28-pound, 12-ounce striper the day before in the same area of the lake, near Sandy Point, and told his friend he could have the next one.

“It hit on my rod, so I let him have it,” Flatt said Thursday from his Meadview home where he and Ginkins were cutting the belly open on the 48-pounder.

“I was driving my boat and Jack said we were hooked on the bottom ’cause it kept taking the drag out. He was pulling the drag and headed for the middle of the lake. He made six or eight good runs.”

It took about 10 minutes to reel in the big fish, Flatt said.

The catches were a personal best for Flatt and his friend, who’ve been fishing Lake Mead about 250 days a year for last four years. Flatt said he caught a 23½-pounder about 10 years ago.

“We haven’t seen very many big ones lately, but they’re still out there,” he said.

Originally from San Bernardino, California, Flatt said he’s fished Big Bear and Silverwood lakes, but those fish don’t fight as much because they’re trout-fed.

Flatt said they used Storm soft baits, a rubber imitation fish, to catch the lunkers. They prefer Storm over other brands because the fish can’t bite the tails off as easily.

Lake Mead park rangers asked the fishermen to look for endangered razorback suckers when they cut into the big striper, but all they found was a smaller striper, about a pound and a half, Flatt said.