Letter | Re: Gosar’s siblings

Paul Gosar

Paul Gosar

With regard to the letter to Paul Gosar from his family, I would like to make comment.

First, it must have been hard for this family to publicly disavow his statements. It took character and pride in the values they were raised with. It was made with humility and courage.

When Congressman Gosar made those comments, I was quite upset and concerned that a member of Congress, representing my home district, would use such an extremist tactic that was both inappropriate and frightening.

Growing up in a Jewish family who lost relatives in World War II, I could not imagine a more insulting and incendiary “suggestion” of a statement, totally based on innuendo.

This is not confined to Congressman Gosar.

We are seeing total chaos in the area of “information.” The danger of these types of unfounded innuendo and conspiracy theories is that there is usually a scapegoat, someone to blame, someone we can make “other.” This fires the flames of anti-everything! It divides us, making us fearful and suspicious of each other.

It is the propaganda of hate. And it works more often than one would think. And it seems to be at an epidemic proportion in our political and public life right now. We even see that some of this rhetoric has been hacked by Russians into our social media platforms.

So we should be mindful of what we believe, of what we hear, of what someone “suggests.”

Some key red flags might be “I heard” or “I think” or “someone said” while maligning an individual or group.

I think it would be better to talk about what unites us. What we are when we look at each other. The hopes and values we share. What we can build when we are working together. And let the haters die on the vine.

Sharon Weber

Kingman