Songwriting is more than just a ‘Melody’

Landon Colvig, Kingman native and student at UNLV, will be releasing his first music EP, “Melody,” on Friday. He produced a music video to the last track that was shot at the dry lake bed on Stockton Hill Road.

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Landon Colvig, Kingman native and student at UNLV, will be releasing his first music EP, “Melody,” on Friday. He produced a music video to the last track that was shot at the dry lake bed on Stockton Hill Road.

KINGMAN – Landon Colvig is exploring his talent as an aspiring musician and producer while studying mechanical engineering at University of Nevada at Las Vegas, finishing his first EP, “Melody,” that will be released digitally on Friday.

He released a music video to the EP’s last track on Sept. 1.

The Kingman native and son of music pastor Dean Colvig began taking piano lessons at age 3, picked up the violin at age 8 and learned bass guitar at age 10.

“Being home-schooled allowed me to spend much more time practicing my instruments, writing and producing music,” Colvig said between classes at UNLV.

He played violin with Mohave Community Orchestra and bass guitar for the band at Central Church. When he wasn’t playing music or studying, he was playing baseball for Kingman Academy.

Music was fundamental to Colvig’s intellectual development and helped him excel in school. At the same time he graduated high school in May, he also completed two associate degrees from Mohave Community College in mathematics and engineering.

Colvig was browsing Spotify music charts in 2014 when he came across the track “Under Control” produced by Alesso and Calvin Harris.

After listening to the track a few times, he started researching production of electronic music. He watched interviews and studio sessions with big-name producers and DJs such as Martin Garrix, Swedish House Mafia, and Hardwell.

Colvig bought a Macbook Pro to produce his own music, and he’s been working on developing a signature sound and bringing his music and production techniques up to commercial standards.

He draws from a large pool of musical influences.

“I grew up playing classical music, so writing chords and melodies came naturally,” Colvig said. “As for the music I listen to lately, I find myself listening to pop music. I like pop music released today, but I also spend a lot of time listening to hits from the past 100 years.”

That spans the spectrum from Louis Armstrong, Frank Sinatra and Aretha Franklin to Whitney Houston, Avicii and Coldplay.

Colvig said he produced the EP and music video to “stretch myself as an artist,” and wants to use his music and personality as a platform to promote Christian faith and family values.

His favorite track from the EP is “Dreamer.”

“It’s the easiest song on the EP for me to listen to because I’m not used to hearing my own voice,” he said.

His friend, Hailey Puaa, sang backup vocals on the song and it ended up being a “great fit,” he said.

“The music itself means the most to me because I just moved away from home for the first time and I am blessed in the sense that it was hard for me to leave,” he said.

The music video started out as a photo shoot before Colvig delved into the EP. He wanted to take pictures on the dry lake bed on Stockton Hill Road, and decided a video would draw extra attention to his music.

“Funny thing about the video was that we filmed it before I had finished writing the song. I just picked a BPM (beats per minute) and sang the lyrics at the BPM when we shot it. It was hard not to laugh because it felt very stupid at the time,” Colving said.

“This EP is an opportunity for me to show my friends and family that I am serious about writing music, and an attempt to write music that captures the attention of everyone.”