Mohave County land has been removed from high hazard flood zones

A Honda got caught in a flash flood several years ago in the Sacramento Wash. FEMA has removed 3,200 parcels of land in Mohave County from its high hazard list.

Miner File Photo

A Honda got caught in a flash flood several years ago in the Sacramento Wash. FEMA has removed 3,200 parcels of land in Mohave County from its high hazard list.

KINGMAN – More than 3,200 land parcels in Mohave County have been removed from FEMA’s high hazard zones since 2009, according to Mohave County Flood District.

The flood district asked the Federal Emergency Management Agency to look at areas in question after finding errors in FEMA’s 2009 floodplain map.

These areas are identified as special flood hazard areas, defined as area that will be inundated by the flood event having a 1 percent chance of annual flood.

The county has been updating FEMA maps since 2009, and the work is paying off in potential savings on flood insurance rates for residents in those areas, Supervisor Buster Johnson said.

“The 2009 maps were all based off information obtained with old technology,” he said. “We have new technology that can give us a more accurate picture of the flood risk in these areas.”

Removing 3,200 parcels from FEMA’s high hazard zones represents about $1.6 million in flood insurance premium savings.

Average cost for flood insurance is about $500 a year.

In late 2015, Mohave County Flood Control District did a study of the Fort Mohave area and determined 1,400 parcels could be removed from the flood plain.

“These folks went from paying for flood insurance every year to being able to remove the insurance altogether,” Johnson said.

Mohave County is currently analyzing flood risk in east and north areas of Golden Valley, with initial estimates that 204 residences and 441 parcels may be removed from FEMA’s high hazard area.