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8:34 PM Sun, Nov. 18th

Still plenty of work to be done in Texas for Harvey volunteers


Sally Greensill, with her dog, Moon Man, in tow, brings an inflatable boat to be donated to Hurricane Harvey flood victims in Houston. Behind her is Shane Isbell, a truck driver who took a load of supplies to Houston while on a pet rescue mission.

Photo by Hubble Ray Smith.

Sally Greensill, with her dog, Moon Man, in tow, brings an inflatable boat to be donated to Hurricane Harvey flood victims in Houston. Behind her is Shane Isbell, a truck driver who took a load of supplies to Houston while on a pet rescue mission.

KINGMAN – It was quite a trip for truck-driving team Shane Isbell and Tracy Langley delivering pet supplies to animal rescue shelters in the Houston area in the wake of Hurricane Harvey.

They took a load of supplies from Kingman to Dallas in their trailer, had trouble purchasing a vehicle from a third party and went through a dealer for a 2001 Suburban, then drove to Houston and helped a guy with a 14-foot flat-bottom boat rescue an 87-year-old veteran.

“It was a very humbling experience,” Isbell said of his rescue work. “We’ve got it easy.”

News coverage has shifted from Hurricane Harvey in Texas to Hurricane Irma in Florida, and now all eyes are on Hurricane Jose.

There’s still a lot of work to be done in Houston, Langley said, and since they may make weekly hauls from Phoenix to Dallas, they’re going to continue doing what they can.

“We came back on Wednesday and went back out Thursday morning from Phoenix with people stuff,” Langley said.

They brought seven dogs and nine kittens back from Houston and gave them to All About Animals, a no-kill rescue shelter in Glendale that had lined up foster homes for the animals.

Isbell said he was dispatched to an address in one neighborhood to pick up a stranded dog, but it was gone when he got there, so they picked up another dog that neighbors said they’d never seen. He left his number and the address where the dog was found in case the owners come looking for it.

“There was still a lot of flooding,” Langley said. “We stayed in Houston the first day and then went to Orange. They got hit the hardest. Everything would be normal and fine in one place, and then further south toward the center of town, all of that was flooded.”

Tim Lamoreaux, maintenance manager of Dillon Transportation in Kingman, gave an update on his company’s response to Hurricane Harvey at Tuesday’s meeting of Kingman and Mohave Manufacturing Association.

Dillon sent two 53-foot trailers loaded with supplies to Houston last week, with leftovers picked up by Hard Ride Transport of Kingman.

“The response was overwhelming,” Lamoreaux said. “Within 24 hours, the first trailer was full. Even after the second trailer, we could have filled a third one.”

Between the Kingman trailers and those dispatched from Dillon’s headquarters in Tennessee, the company probably sent 120,000 to 130,000 pounds of supplies to Houston. The second trailer was probably overweight, but nobody was checking when they found out the supplies were headed for Houston, Lamoreaux said.

As far as any disruptions to business at Kingman Airport and Industrial Park as a result of the hurricanes, a representative from Karnac West said they’re “picking up the slack” from their plant in Florida.

Bob Riley, economic developer for Kingman Airport Authority, said a few companies in the plastics industry are concerned about getting resin and other raw materials.