Kingman’s Candida Hunter receives Flinn-Brown honor

Candida Hunter

Courtesy

Candida Hunter

KINGMAN – Candida Hunter, senior director of Tribal Affairs, First Things First, and Chairwoman of the Grand Canyon Resort Corporation Board of Directors, was one of four people from Northern Arizona selected for the 2017 Flinn-Brown Civic Leadership Academy, the flagship program of the Arizona Center for Civic Leadership.

The 33 Flinn-Brown fellows come from different walks of life and political perspectives, but share a common commitment to public service and leadership.

They will participate in a 12-part seminar in the fall led by Arizona policy and political experts, beginning a long affiliation with the Flinn-Brown Network.

Hunter is the first fellow to be selected from Kingman. She’s a member of the BUILD Equity Leaders Action Network, which works to promote racial equity in early childhood.

Prior to joining First Things First, Hunter served as Hualapai Tribal Council member and as a volunteer on the FTF Hualapai Tribe Regional Partnership Council.

She is a mother, human services professional and former policymaker who strongly believes the success of future generations begins in the early years of life.

Her presentation at the Flinn-Brown seminar will be about Arizona’s American Indian tribes’ ongoing efforts with the recently established Arizona Early Childhood Development and Health Board, known as First Things First.

The primary goal is to provide guidance on funding decisions for services focused on young children and their families. From its inception, FTF developed an approach to working with Arizona’s tribal communities in ways that honor their culture and tribal sovereignty, particularly around research and evaluation.

The Flinn-Brown network functions as an ongoing personal and professional support system for fellows as they pursue roles as state-level elected officials, state agency executives, policy advisors and members of state commissions.

“The connections made through the network enhance the opportunity to impact the state’s policy and political landscape,” said Nancy Welch, director of the Arizona Center for Civic Leadership.

The Phoenix-based nonprofit Flinn Foundation was founded by Dr. Robert Flinn and his wife, Irene, in 1965 to support advancement of Arizona’s bioscience sector, arts and culture.

The newest fellows represent both the private and public sectors and work in business, government, nonprofit organizations and education.

Other Flinn-Brown fellows from Northern Arizona are Clare Aslan, landscape conservation initiative, Northern Arizona University; Daryl Melvin, president of Melvin Consulting, Flagstaff; and Janet Regner, director of Coconino County Community Services, Flagstaff.