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10:40 AM Tue, Nov. 13th

Praying for a miracle: Mother seeks help to give son a second chance

Kinith Massey, 6, and his mom, Vanessa Bell, during his kindergarten graduation last year. Kinith is hoping for a medical procedure that could restore the use of his legs after a horrific auto accident nearly four years ago. (Courtesy)

Kinith Massey, 6, and his mom, Vanessa Bell, during his kindergarten graduation last year. Kinith is hoping for a medical procedure that could restore the use of his legs after a horrific auto accident nearly four years ago. (Courtesy)

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Despite only having movement from his hips up, Kinith’s spirit isn’t broken. He enjoys painting, hiding and finding painted rocks. (Courtesy)

Imagine being a 6-year-old boy wishing he could just stand from his wheelchair or jump in a bounce house with all the other children at the birthday party.

Kinith Jack Massey can’t do that, but he has an opportunity for a second chance to walk again. A medical procedure could make his two motionless legs run, walk, and stand again. Kinith, a 6-year-old Kingman boy, has a chance to be like every other child around him.

When Kinith was 3 years old, he was involved in a head-on collision.

Today, almost four years later, Kinith is confined to a wheelchair because of the injuries he suffered as a result. His spinal cord was damaged, which caused his organs to fail, and he only has movement from his hips up. He doesn’t get to freely roam like a child should.

Vanessa Bell, his mother, is currently pregnant with Kinith’s little brother and is hoping to raise money for a procedure where doctors can take the tissue and blood of the umbilical cord and store it until the medical procedure can be completed at a later time.

“The tissue from the umbilical cord has the capability of repairing the spine,” Bell said.

The tissue from the umbilical cord and blood will cost Bell up to $5,000 to store them for 20 years, plus a $200 processing fee. She has started a GoFundMe page in hopes of raising the money before she is due Sept. 3. She only became aware of the procedure six weeks before her due date.

For this mother, it’s painful to see her child wishing and wanting to do more. Bell hopes to see her son be a child one day and run with the other children. Kinith isn’t aware of what his mother is doing that will hopefully bring back movement to his legs.

“I don’t want to get his hopes up,” Bell said.

Massey is a proud Cub Scout, enjoys Star Wars, Transformers, and hopes to grow up one day and own John Deere tractors.

“Being paralyzed hasn’t broken his spirit,” Bell said.

His grandmother, Terri Wigal, shared a moment when Kinith told her that during a Cub Scouts ceremony the scouts stood up to recognize, but he “wished the man driving the opposite direction didn’t hit him” because he couldn’t stand with the other Cub Scouts.

“I regret every time I ever yelled at him for being a kid,” Bell said with tears in her eyes.

For Bell, she described seeing her son in his condition a “struggle.” She said Kinith only had a little bit of time to be a child because for the first two years after the accident she kept him in a bubble.

Now she hopes and prays for this medical procedure. She hopes and prays for her son to have the opportunity to be a child again.

To donate, visit https://www.gofundme.com/spinal-repair-for-kinith-massey.