Supervisors hold tax rates steady for flood control, library and TV districts

Kingman resident John Lutenske reads his comments about tax rates for Mohave County’s flood control, library and television districts during a call to the public at Monday’s Mohave County Board of Supervisors regular meeting. (Photo by Hubble Ray Smith/Daily Miner)

Kingman resident John Lutenske reads his comments about tax rates for Mohave County’s flood control, library and television districts during a call to the public at Monday’s Mohave County Board of Supervisors regular meeting. (Photo by Hubble Ray Smith/Daily Miner)

KINGMAN – The Mohave County Board of Supervisors approved tax rates for the Flood Control District, Free Library District and Television District for Fiscal Year 2018-2019 that are the same as the rates adopted last year.

The board voted unanimously Monday to adopt the Flood Control District tax rate of 50 cents for every $100 of assessed value, 27 cents for the Free Library District and 2 cents for the Television District.

State law requires a truth-in-taxation hearing for the amount of taxes to be levied each year on taxable real property in the district as considered necessary or appropriate to pay administration expenses and maintain and operate the Flood Control, Free Library and Television districts.

Supervisor Hildy Angius noted that the board has not raised taxes in six years and works hard to keep taxes low.

The county’s portion of property owners’ tax bills is 17 percent, with secondary tax districts accounting for the majority of the bill, she said.

“If you’re angry, go to those boards,” she told citizens during the truth in taxation hearings. “You want to come here and yell, go there and yell. I suggest everyone look at the pie chart and see where their taxes go, but at this time, the board is not raising taxes.”

The Television District total tax levy will increase from $1.74 million in 2018 to $1.81 million in 2019; Free Library District tax goes from $4.72 million to $4.92 million; and Flood Control District tax increases from $7.66 million to $8.04 million.

John Lutenske, speaking during the public comment period, wanted to know if county supervisors spend the same amount of time trying to lower taxes as they do trying to raise them.

“I know what you say the money will be used for, but I also know that at times it goes to pay the retirements of favored retiring employees that are given a raise at the last minute on their way out to increase their monthly retirement check,” he said.

Lutenske cited a report about Arizona collecting more than $10.1 billion for its general fund during Fiscal Year 2017-2018, the most annual revenue ever recorded during a fiscal year.

“The last time you raised taxes, you said it was because the state took our county money,” he mentioned. “Is the board or any member trying to get our money back or asking for an increase from the state to compensate us for our loss of funds to them?”

When the real estate market crashed, tax revenue dropped, and the county was forced to tighten its belt but was still able to continue operations, Lutenske added.

“I would greatly appreciated it if you would use your time wisely and look into lowering our taxes and not working overtime on how to raise them,” he said.