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2:46 AM Wed, Nov. 21st

Scott Holtry: Council candidate for “growth and water sustainability”

Write-in Council candidate Scott Holtry says he’s pro-development, and if elected would work to promote Kingman’s growth and would strive to remedy water sustainability issues. (Submitted photo)

Write-in Council candidate Scott Holtry says he’s pro-development, and if elected would work to promote Kingman’s growth and would strive to remedy water sustainability issues. (Submitted photo)

KINGMAN – Write-in Council candidates are poised to play a significant role in Tuesday’s primary election seeing as there is only one valid candidate fixed to be on the ballot, and Scott Holtry, one of those write-ins, wants residents to know that if elected he will put an emphasis on local water issues and the growth and development of Kingman.

A primary component of that growth, and one supported by Holtry, is the 1 percent TPT, or sales tax, increase ratified by Council in January. He says that increase is “absolutely” necessary.

“I think the City of Kingman needs that tax, both for our current conditions with our roads and improvements we need to do to our city but also for the capital improvements,” he said. “Funding both interchanges is something I’m absolutely for, and without that TPT tax we would not be able to fund probably either of the interchanges, even with the deal Kingman Regional Medical Center is trying to make with the City.”

The City and KRMC are currently hashing out a development agreement for the funding of the Kingman Crossing interchange. According to the proposed development agreement provided to Council, the City would pay the hospital back for its investment using TPT revenue from the area around the interchange.

“I think that if they’re going to help us out and kind of front the bill at the beginning, then absolutely they should be reimbursed for basically giving us an interest-free loan to build that interchange,” Holtry said. “It would only benefit us to make that agreement and be able to build the interchange quicker and get it done so we can get development in there.”

Holtry is a planner for Mohave County and said his experience in the field has allowed him to see what happens to a city that doesn’t grow. He likes the small-town feel he gets from Kingman, but believes the City needs to continue moving forward.

“I think it’s vital the City of Kingman continues to grow,” Holtry said. “With my experience as a planner I’ve seen several cities where if they’re not growing, they’re moving backward and deteriorating. By continuing to grow and fielding both interchanges, it provides new opportunities for new jobs and new families to move into the community to help the economic growth of the city.”

Holtry, who describes himself as pro-development, also says he will work to promote growth and development for Kingman’s “unique” downtown. Again pulling from his experience as a planner, Holtry said he’s seen cities offer incentives such as grants for business owners to populate downtown areas. He thinks Kingman could do the same.

However, one of his primary goals should he be elected to Council would be addressing water sustainability. He noted that as a county planner he’s researched the amount of water farms in the county are using, and said that rate is not sustainable.

“I’ve been able to do a lot of research on ways that we can remedy the situation we’re currently in, and really what it comes down to is changing legislation to be able to allow maybe a tax on some of these larger water users, or being able to monitor who goes in and then how much water they can use.” Holtry said. “But it all has to come through state legislation.”