Council candidate Deana Nelson wants progress on Kingman Crossing

Write-in Council candidate Deana Nelson says the City needs to get moving on the Kingman Crossing interchange, and needs to “stop suing everybody.” (Photo by Travis Rains/Daily Miner)

Write-in Council candidate Deana Nelson says the City needs to get moving on the Kingman Crossing interchange, and needs to “stop suing everybody.” (Photo by Travis Rains/Daily Miner)

KINGMAN – Deana Nelson, write-in candidate for City Council, says she can’t be bought or played and if elected in the Aug. 28 primary election would focus on breaking ground with Kingman Regional Medical center for the construction of the Kingman Crossing interchange.

“We have a perfect opportunity with KRMC sitting there, why don’t we move with them right away?” Nelson asked. She later added that “It should have been handled and dealt with, we should be breaking ground by now.”

She also wants to find a way forward for the Rancho Santa Fe interchange, “but not on the backs of our citizens, it’s not right to saddle our citizens with that.”

According to a Facebook post, which she declined to comment on further, Nelson is concerned about Las Vegas-based Sunbelt Development & Realty Partners and its potential involvement with Rancho Santa Fe. According to her research, the managing partner of Sunbelt, Bill Lenhart, and the next listed partner, Scott Paulbick, are also managing partners of the limited liability companies that comprise the corporation which owns large portions of land in the area of the proposed interchange.

She also noted Sunbelt is a member of the Kingman and Mohave Manufacturing Association.

“So KAMMA clearly has a vested interest in the development of the land that lies between I-40 and the airport,” Nelson wrote on Facebook. “The citizens of Kingman are being asked to use our tax money to develop the infrastructure that benefits these Las Vegas developers.”

Speaking to those tax dollars, she believes the Transaction Privilege Tax increase was “done incorrectly,” and is “98 percent certain” the Kingman Citizens for Responsible Taxation initiative will pass. That initiative would do away with the 1 percent increase and would require any future increases to the sales and use tax rates to go before the voters.

When it comes to downtown development, Nelson thinks those entrepreneurs are a solid group that have development under control. Government, she said, should stay out of the way.

“The downtown boys and girls, they’re good. They’ve got a really good handle on what they’re doing,” Nelson said. “The government does not need to interfere (with) everything in the community. A lot of times when you do that it does not help the situation.”

Aside from Kingman Crossing, Nelson also wants to see more progress at the Kingman Airport.

“We need to get it cleaned up, get it looking nice,” she said. “That would be a beautiful place to start, let’s just start there.”