Route 66 road crew wants your signature for historic trail designation

The Silver Bullet Airstream travel trailer being used as a media center by the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Route 66 road crew is parked under Gemini Giant in Wilmington, Illinois, one of many peculiar landmarks along the highway. (Photo by David Kafer/National Trust for Historic Preservation)

The Silver Bullet Airstream travel trailer being used as a media center by the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Route 66 road crew is parked under Gemini Giant in Wilmington, Illinois, one of many peculiar landmarks along the highway. (Photo by David Kafer/National Trust for Historic Preservation)

KINGMAN – Roadies from the National Trust for Historic Preservation are scheduled to stop at the Powerhouse Visitor Center today as part of their month-long trip recording stories about the people and landmarks along Route 66.

The purpose of the trip is to raise awareness about the trust’s effort to designate Route 66 as a National Historic Trail. The crew of writers and photographers started out July 2 in Chicago and have been blogging stories along the way.

Members of the Historic Route 66 Association of Arizona and Kingman community leaders will be hosting the road crew from 3-5 p.m. today at the Powerhouse, where they will be taking pictures, collecting signatures for their petition and visiting with local residents.

Route 66 Association member Nikki Seegers is encouraging people to come down to the Powerhouse and sign the petition for designation of Route 66 as a National Historic Trail.

“They would like to see our Route 66 Museum and go over to the train at Locomotive Park and Mr. D’z,” Seegers said, adding that the road crew will be spending the night in Kingman on the final leg of their tour.

“Their main purpose is to get signatures for the designation. They made a call out to get social media gurus, I guess you’d call them, to spread the word and get a buzz going about Route 66 as a National Historic Trail.”

The permanent designation of Route 66 as a National Historic Trail will bring greater public interest and investment to communities such as Kingman and encourage economic revitalization, according to the trust’s website.

Most importantly, it will help preserve Route 66 as a vital, iconic and evolving piece of Americana for generations to come.

“The last week on Route 66 was hot – over 100 degrees on most days,” Morgan Vickers posted Wednesday. “As we drove from Oklahoma to Texas to New Mexico, the earth shifted from green to tan to orange, and the road beneath our feet transformed from old pavement to gravel to dirt. But what remained consistent was the people and their love for the places they stood by.”

Amy Webb, senior field director for the National Trust for Historic Preservation, said Route 66 is the most iconic, culturally celebrated and internationally recognized stretch of highway in America.

“Driving Route 66 is the quintessential road trip,” she said. “By promoting this authentic experience, we can help preserve a beloved icon and at the same time, revive local economies in rural communities.”

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